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Page 175

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER IV - GEMISTUS PLETHO

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THE traveller who has gone into the Peloponnese for the purpose of visiting ancient Sparta, will find his attention diverted from classical scenes to a place whose name is probably unfamiliar to him, and whose appearance is certainly unexpected. From the base of Mount Taygetus a small but steep hill projects into the plain, bearing the ruins of a castle on its summit, and the ruins of churches, palaces, and monasteries on its sides. The castle is surprisingly big, and, though the churches are surprisingly tiny, each has, or has had, its little dome and battered marble pillars, its mosaic pavement under foot, its perishing frescoes of mysterious saints upon the walls. Fifteen people live here now, and act as guides. But the place was once closely-perhaps too closely-populated, and has witnessed an elaborate if defective civilization. Such a place has no business in Greece. Yet the traveller may possibly neglect the Sparta museum, where he had intended to spend so much time over the archaic reliefs, and wander instead through the remnants of this unfamiliar world, nearer in its date than the world of Lycurgus, yet in its spirit even more remote.
The great castle looks up a gorge into the white ridges of Taygetus behind, and in front it looks over the broad blue valley of the Eurotas : over New Sparta with its large pink cathedral and dreary boulevards ; over the spacious site of Old Sparta, whose simple buildings have crumbled into the plain and are buried underneath the corn. But, when we enquire into the history of a place which is so wonderful in itself and in its situation, we meet with disappointment. We read that the Franks built it in the thirteenth century and called it Misithras or Mistrh ; that it became the chief fortress in the Peloponnese during an uninteresting period ; that it was taken from the Franks by the Byzantines, and from the Byzantines by, the Turks ; that it was

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE 1 what is traveller who has gone into what is Peloponnese for what is purpose of what is ing ancient Sparta, will find his attention diverted from classical scenes to a place whose name is probably unfamiliar to him, and whose appearance is certainly unexpected. From what is base of Mount Taygetus a small but steep hill projects into what is plain, bearing what is ruins of a castle on its summit, and what is ruins of churches, palaces, and monasteries on its sides. what is castle is surprisingly big, and, though what is churches are surprisingly tiny, each has, or has had, its little dome and battered marble pillars, its mosaic pavement under foot, its perishing frescoes of mysterious saints upon what is walls. Fifteen people live here now, and act as guides. But what is place was once closely-perhaps too closely-populated, and has witnessed an elaborate if defective civilization. Such a place has no business in Greece. Yet what is trave where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 175 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER IV - GEMISTUS PLETHO where is p align="justify" 1 what is traveller who has gone into what is Peloponnese for what is purpose of what is ing ancient Sparta, will find his attention diverted from classical scenes to a place whose name is probably unfamiliar to him, and whose appearance is certainly unexpected. From the base of Mount Taygetus a small but steep hill projects into the plain, bearing what is ruins of a castle on its summit, and what is ruins of churches, palaces, and monasteries on its sides. what is castle is surprisingly big, and, though what is churches are surprisingly tiny, each has, or has had, its little dome and battered marble pillars, its mosaic pavement under foot, its perishing frescoes of mysterious saints upon what is walls. Fifteen people live here now, and act as guides. But what is place was once closely-perhaps too closely-populated, and has witnessed an elaborate if defective civilization. Such a place has no business in Greece. Yet the traveller may possibly neglect what is Sparta museum, where he had intended to spend so much time over what is archaic reliefs, and wander instead through what is remnants of this unfamiliar world, nearer in its date than what is world of Lycurgus, yet in its spirit even more remote. what is great castle looks up a gorge into what is white ridges of Taygetus behind, and in front it looks over what is broad blue valley of the Eurotas : over New Sparta with its large pink cathedral and dreary boulevards ; over what is spacious site of Old Sparta, whose simple buildings have crumbled into what is plain and are buried underneath what is corn. But, when we enquire into what is history of a place which is so wonderful in itself and in its situation, we meet with disappointment. We read that what is Franks built it in what is thirteenth century and called it Misithras or Mistrh ; that it became what is chief fortress in what is Peloponnese during an uninteresting period ; that it was taken from what is Franks by what is Byzantines, and from what is Byzantines by, what is Turks ; that it was where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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