Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 163

PART III - THE PAST
CHAPTER I - THE CONSOLATIONS OF HISTORY

IT is pleasant to be transferred from an office where one is afraid of a sergeant-major into an office where one can intimidate generals, and perhaps this is why History is so attractive to the more timid amongst us. We can recover selfconfidence by snubbing the dead. The captains and the kings depart at our slightest censure, while as for the ' hosts of minor officials 'who cumber court and camp, we heed them not, although in actual life they entirely block our social horizon. We cannot visit either the great or the rich when they are our contemporaries, but by a fortunate arrangement the palaces of Ujjain and the warehouses of Ormus are open for ever, and we can even behave outrageously in them without being expelled. The King of Ujjain, we announce, is extravagant, the merchants of Ormus unspeakably licentious . . . and sure enough Ormus is a desert now and Ujjain a jungle. Difficult to realize that the past was once the present, and that, transferred to it, one would be just the same little worm as to-day, unimportant, parasitic, nervous, occupied with trifles, unable to go anywhere or alter anything, friendly only with the obscure, and only at ease with the dead ; while up on the heights the figures and forces who make History would contend in their habitual fashion, with incomprehensible noises or in ominous quiet. ` There is money in my house . . . there is no money . . . no house.' That is all that our sort can ever know about doom. The extravagant king, the licentious merchants-they escape, knowing the ropes.
If only the sense of actuality can be lulled-and it sleeps for ever in most historians-there is no passion that cannot be gratified in the past. The past is devoid of all dangers, social and moral, and one can meet with perfect ease not only kings, but people who are even rarer on one's visiting list. We are alluding to courtesans. It is seemly and decent to meditate upon dead courtesans. Some, like Aspasia, are in themselves a liberal

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE IT is pleasant to be transferred from an office where one is afraid of a sergeant-major into an office where one can intimidate generals, and perhaps this is why History is so attractive to what is more timid amongst us. We can recover selfconfidence by snubbing what is dead. what is captains and what is kings depart at our slightest censure, while as for what is ' hosts of minor officials 'who cumber court and camp, we heed them not, although in actual life they entirely block our social horizon. We cannot what is either what is great or what is rich when they are our contemporaries, but by a fortunate arrangement what is palaces of Ujjain and what is warehouses of Ormus are open for ever, and we can even behave outrageously in them without being expelled. what is King of Ujjain, we announce, is extravagant, what is merchants of Ormus unspeakably licentious . . . and sure enough Ormus is a desert now and Ujjain a jungle. Difficult where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 163 where is strong PART III - what is PAST CHAPTER I - what is CONSOLATIONS OF HISTORY where is p align="justify" IT is pleasant to be transferred from an office where one is afraid of a sergeant-major into an office where one can intimidate generals, and perhaps this is why History is so attractive to the more timid amongst us. We can recover selfconfidence by snubbing what is dead. what is captains and what is kings depart at our slightest censure, while as for what is ' hosts of minor officials 'who cumber court and camp, we heed them not, although in actual life they entirely block our social horizon. We cannot what is either what is great or what is rich when they are our contemporaries, but by a fortunate arrangement what is palaces of Ujjain and what is warehouses of Ormus are open for ever, and we can even behave outrageously in them without being expelled. what is King of Ujjain, we announce, is extravagant, the merchants of Ormus unspeakably licentious . . . and sure enough Ormus is a desert now and Ujjain a jungle. Difficult to realize that what is past was once what is present, and that, transferred to it, one would be just what is same little worm as to-day, unimportant, parasitic, nervous, occupied with trifles, unable to go anywhere or alter anything, friendly only with what is obscure, and only at ease with what is dead ; while up on what is heights what is figures and forces who make History would contend in their habitual fashion, with incomprehensible noises or in ominous quiet. ` There is money in my house . . . there is no money . . . no house.' That is all that our sort can ever know about doom. what is extravagant king, what is licentious merchants-they escape, knowing what is ropes. If only what is sense of actuality can be lulled-and it sleeps for ever in most historians-there is no passion that cannot be gratified in what is past. what is past is devoid of all dangers, social and moral, and one can meet with perfect ease not only kings, but people who are even rarer on one's what is ing list. We are alluding to courtesans. It is seemly and decent to meditate upon dead courtesans. Some, like Aspasia, are in themselves a liberal where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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