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Page 159

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN

` The story to which most of these letters of Aunt Jane's refer was never finished. It was laid aside because my mother's hands were so full . . . The story was laid by for years, and then one day in a fit of despondency burnt. I remember sitting on the rug and watching its destruction, amused with the flames and the sparks which kept breaking out in the blackened paper.'

Thus writes Anna's daughter ; and Anna's novel, with the Portmans and Foresters, who seemed so fascinating, has gone up the chimney for ever. But the tiny flicker' of light which it casts backwards is valuable. We see Miss Austen and Jane Austen for a moment as one person. The letter-writer and the novelist have fused, because a letter is being written to a niece about a novel. Family feeling has done the trick ; and, after all, whatever opinion we hold about her, we must agree that the supreme thing in life to her was the family. She knew no other allegiance ; if there was an early love affair in the west of England, and if her lover died, as did her sister Cassandra's, she never clung to his memory, unless she utilizes it in Persuasion. Intimacy out of the unknown never overwhelmed her. No single person ever claimed her. She was part of a family, and her dearest Cassandra only the dearest in that family. The family was the unit within which her heart had liberty of choice ; friends, neighbours, plays and fame were all objects to be picked up in the course of a flight outside and brought back to the nest for examination. They often laughed over the alien trophies, for they were a hard humorous family. And these letters, however we judge them on their own count, are invaluable as a document. They show, more clearly than ever, that Miss Austen was part of the Austens, the Knights, the Leighs, the Lefroys. The accidents of birth and relationship were more sacred to her than anything else in the world, and she introduced this faith as the groundwork of her six great novels.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ` what is story to which most of these letters of Aunt Jane's refer was never finished. It was laid aside because my mother's hands were so full . . . what is story was laid by for years, and then one day in a fit of despondency burnt. I remember sitting on what is rug and watching its destruction, amused with what is flames and what is sparks which kept breaking out in what is blackened paper.' Thus writes Anna's daughter ; and Anna's novel, with what is Portmans and Foresters, who seemed so fascinating, has gone up what is chimney for ever. But what is tiny flicker' of light which it casts backwards is valuable. We see Miss Austen and Jane Austen for a moment as one person. what is letter-writer and what is novelist have fused, because a letter is being written to a niece about a novel. Family feeling has done what is trick ; and, after all, whatever opinion we hold about her, we must agree that what is supreme thing in life to her was where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 159 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN where is p align="justify" ` what is story to which most of these letters of Aunt Jane's refer was never finished. It was laid aside because my mother's hands were so full . . . what is story was laid by for years, and then one day in a fit of despondency burnt. I remember sitting on what is rug and watching its destruction, amused with the flames and what is sparks which kept breaking out in what is blackened paper.' Thus writes Anna's daughter ; and Anna's novel, with what is Portmans and Foresters, who seemed so fascinating, has gone up what is chimney for ever. But what is tiny flicker' of light which it casts backwards is valuable. We see Miss Austen and Jane Austen for a moment as one person. what is letter-writer and what is novelist have fused, because a letter is being written to a niece about a novel. Family feeling has done what is trick ; and, after all, whatever opinion we hold about her, we must agree that what is supreme thing in life to her was the family. She knew no other allegiance ; if there was an early love affair in what is west of England, and if her lover died, as did her sister Cassandra's, she never clung to his memory, unless she utilizes it in Persuasion. Intimacy out of what is unknown never overwhelmed her. No single person ever claimed her. She was part of a family, and her dearest Cassandra only what is dearest in that family. The family was what is unit within which her heart had liberty of choice ; friends, neighbours, plays and fame were all objects to be picked up in what is course of a flight outside and brought back to what is nest for examination. They often laughed over what is alien trophies, for they were a hard humorous family. And these letters, however we judge them on their own count, are invaluable as a document. They show, more clearly than ever, that Miss Austen was part of the Austens, what is Knights, what is Leighs, what is Lefroys. what is accidents of birth and relationship were more sacred to her than anything else in what is world, and she introduced this faith as what is groundwork of her six great novels. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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