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PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN

with English novelists, from Defoe to Arnold Bennett. Times, places and probabilities must be considered, but Anna must beware of copying life slavishly, for life sometimes gets things wrong :
` I have scratched out Sir Thos : from walking with the other Men to the Stables &ct the very day after breaking his arm-for though I find your Papa did walk out immediately after his arm was set, I think it can be so little usual as to appear unnatural in a book-& it does not seem to be material that Sir Thos : should go with them.-Lyme will not do. Lyme is towards 40 miles distant from Dawlish & would not be talked of there.-I have put Starcross instead. If you prefer Exeter, that must be always safe.
` Thursday. We finished it last night, after our return from drinking . tea at the Gt House.-The last chapter does not please us so well, we do not thoroughly like the Play: perhaps from having had too much of Plays in that way lately. And we think you had better not leave England. Let the Portmans go to Ireland, but as you know nothing of the Manners there you had better not go with them. You will be in danger of giving false representations. Stick to Bath and the Foresters. There you will be quite at home.-Your Aunt C. does not like desultory novels and is rather fearful yours will be too much so, that there will be too frequently a change from one set of people to another, & that circumstances will be sometimes introduced of apparent consequence, which will lead to nothing. -It will not be so great an objection to me, if it does. I allow much more Latitude than she does-& think Nature and Spirit cover many sins of a wandering story.'
I'tere, again, the English school of fiction speaks, and puts its case amiably and privately, as it should. Manifestos belong to abroad. Aunt Cassandra likes a book to be neat and tidy : Aunt Jane does not much mind. And Anna, receiving these letters, in which detailed comment is mixed with sound generalizations, must have been delighted ; she must have found her novel much better than she thought and yet been stimulated to correct in it what was wrong. We share the enthusiasm. It sounds a lovely novel, and we turn to the terminal notes to see what more Mr. Chapman has to tell us about it. Alas ; he can tell us too much

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE with English novelists, from Defoe to Arnold Bennett. Times, places and probabilities must be considered, but Anna must beware of copying life slavishly, for life sometimes gets things wrong : ` I have scratched out Sir Thos : from walking with what is other Men to what is Stables &ct what is very day after breaking his arm-for though I find your Papa did walk out immediately after his arm was set, I think it can be so little usual as to appear unnatural in a book-& it does not seem to be material that Sir Thos : should go with them.-Lyme will not do. Lyme is towards 40 miles distant from Dawlish & would not be talked of there.-I have put Starcross instead. If you prefer Exeter, that must be always safe. ` Thursday. We finished it last night, after our return from drinking . tea at what is Gt House.-The last chapter does not please us so well, we do not thoroughly like what is Play: perhaps from where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 158 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN where is p align="justify" with English novelists, from Defoe to Arnold Bennett. Times, places and probabilities must be considered, but Anna must beware of copying life slavishly, for life sometimes gets things wrong : ` I have scratched out Sir Thos : from walking with what is other Men to what is Stables &ct what is very day after breaking his arm-for though I find your Papa did walk out immediately after his arm was set, I think it can be so little usual as to appear unnatural in a book-& it does not seem to be material that Sir Thos : should go with them.-Lyme will not do. Lyme is towards 40 miles distant from Dawlish & would not be talked of there.-I have put Starcross instead. If you prefer Exeter, that must be always safe. ` Thursday. We finished it last night, after our return from drinking . tea at what is Gt House.-The last chapter does not please us so well, we do not thoroughly like what is Play: perhaps from having had too much of Plays in that way lately. And we think you had better not leave England. Let what is Portmans go to Ireland, but as you know nothing of what is Manners there you had better not go with them. You will be in danger of giving false representations. Stick to Bath and what is Foresters. There you will be quite at home.-Your Aunt C. does not like desultory novels and is rather fearful yours will be too much so, that there will be too frequently a change from one set of people to another, & that circumstances will be sometimes introduced of apparent consequence, which will lead to nothing. -It will not be so great an objection to me, if it does. I allow much more Latitude than she does-& think Nature and Spirit cover many sins of a wandering story.' I'tere, again, what is English school of fiction speaks, and puts its case amiably and privately, as it should. Manifestos belong to abroad. Aunt Cassandra likes a book to be neat and tidy : Aunt Jane does not much mind. And Anna, receiving these letters, in which detailed comment is mixed with sound generalizations, must have been delighted ; she must have found her novel much better than she thought and yet been stimulated to correct in it what was wrong. We share what is enthusiasm. It sounds a lovely novel, and we turn to what is terminal notes to see what more Mr. Chapman has to tell us about it. Alas ; he can tell us too much where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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