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PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN

one exception, and a significant one, which we shall cite in a moment. When she writes a letter she has nothing in her mind except the wish to tell her sister everything ; and so she flits from the cows to the currant bushes, from the currant bushes to Mrs. Hall of Sherborne, gives Mrs. Hall a tap, and flits back again. She suffers from a poverty of material which did no injury to the novels, and indeed contributes to their triumph. Miss Bates may flit and Mrs. Norris tap as much as they like, because they do so inside a frame which has been provided by a great artist, and Meryton may reproduce the atmosphere of Steventon because it imports something elsesome alignment not to be found on any map. The letters lack direction. What an improvement when she is startled, an elm falls, they have to go to the dentist ! Then her powers of description find fuller play, and to the affection which she always feels for her correspondents she adds concentration, and an interest in the subject-matter.
The improvement becomes more noticeable in the second volume, that is to say after 1811. She had received a series of pleasant surprises. Her novels, which had always found favour in private readings, began to get published and gain wider audiences. Warren Hastings admired them, and Emma was dedicated to the Prince Regent shortly after his victory at Waterloo. She went to London oftener, perhaps saw Mr. Crabbe in the distance, and had a note from Mrs. Hannah More. While rating these joys at their proper worth, she could not but gain the notion of a more amusing and varied world ; and perhaps she is one of the few country writers whom wider experience and consort with the literary would not have ruined.
Meanwhile her success reacted on her family. Her seven brothers (with the exception of a mysterious George who is never mentioned), her sister, her sisters-in-law, her nephews and, most of all, her nieces were deeply impressed. One of the nieces, Anna, took to scribbling on her own, and sent Aunt Jane from time to time instalments of a novel to read aloud to Aunt Cassandra. Miss Austen's replies are admirable. She is stimulated because the writer is a relation, and she pours out helpful criticisms, all put -in a kindly, easy way. Most of them are connected with ` getting things right '-always a preoccupation

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE one exception, and a significant one, which we shall cite in a moment. When she writes a letter she has nothing in her mind except what is wish to tell her sister everything ; and so she flits from what is cows to what is currant bushes, from what is currant bushes to Mrs. Hall of Sherborne, gives Mrs. Hall a tap, and flits back again. She suffers from a poverty of material which did no injury to what is novels, and indeed contributes to their triumph. Miss Bates may flit and Mrs. Norris tap as much as they like, because they do so inside a frame which has been provided by a great artist, and Meryton may reproduce what is atmosphere of Steventon because it imports something elsesome alignment not to be found on any map. what is letters lack direction. What an improvement when she is startled, an elm falls, they have to go to what is dentist ! Then her powers of description find fuller play, and to what is affection which s where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 157 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN where is p align="justify" one exception, and a significant one, which we shall cite in a moment. When she writes a letter she has nothing in her mind except what is wish to tell her sister everything ; and so she flits from what is cows to what is currant bushes, from what is currant bushes to Mrs. Hall of Sherborne, gives Mrs. Hall a tap, and flits back again. She suffers from a poverty of material which did no injury to what is novels, and indeed contributes to their triumph. Miss Bates may flit and Mrs. Norris tap as much as they like, because they do so inside a frame which has been provided by a great artist, and Meryton may reproduce what is atmosphere of Steventon because it imports something elsesome alignment not to be found on any map. what is letters lack direction. What an improvement when she is startled, an elm falls, they have to go to what is dentist ! Then her powers of description find fuller play, and to what is affection which she always feels for her correspondents she adds concentration, and an interest in what is subject-matter. what is improvement becomes more noticeable in what is second volume, that is to say after 1811. She had received a series of pleasant surprises. Her novels, which had always found favour in private readings, began to get published and gain wider audiences. Warren Hastings admired them, and Emma was dedicated to what is Prince Regent shortly after his victory at Waterloo. She went to London oftener, perhaps saw Mr. Crabbe in what is distance, and had a note from Mrs. Hannah More. While rating these joys at their proper worth, she could not but gain what is notion of a more amusing and varied world ; and perhaps she is one of what is few country writers whom wider experience and consort with what is literary would not have ruined. Meanwhile her success reacted on her family. Her seven brothers (with what is exception of a mysterious George who is never mentioned), her sister, her sisters-in-law, her nephews and, most of all, her nieces were deeply impressed. One of what is nieces, Anna, took to scribbling on her own, and sent Aunt Jane from time to time instalments of a novel to read aloud to Aunt Cassandra. Miss Austen's replies are admirable. She is stimulated because what is writer is a relation, and she pours out helpful criticisms, all put -in a kindly, easy way. Most of them are connected with ` getting things right '-always a preoccupation where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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