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PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN

some weeks before she expected, owing to a fright. I suppose she happened unawares to look at her husband.' Did Cassandra laugh ? Probably, but all that we catch at this distance is the whinnying of harpies.
And then we come to the serious moments. Mrs. Jennings follows Lydia Bennet and Sir Thomas Bertram takes the stage, unapproachable, uncontrovertible. Listen how his spirit, though not his style, sums up the merits and demerits of Sir John Moore :

` I am sorry to find that Sir J. Moore has a mother living, but tho' a very Heroick son, he might not be a very necessary one to her happiness.-Deacon Morrell may be more to Mrs. Morrell.-I wish Sir John had united something of the Christian with the Hero in his death.'

And when an intimate sorrow comes (the death of her own father) she yields to formalism and writes :` Your mind will already forestall the sort of event which I have to communicate. -Our dear Father has closed his virtuous & happy life, in a death almost as free from suffering as his Children could have wished.' It is adequate. Sir Thomas Bertram is always that : but it gives no freedom to the heart, it has none of the outpour which we found in that letter quoted above from Cassandra.
Triviality, varied by touches of ill breeding and of sententiousness, characterizes these letters as a whole, particularly the earlier letters ; and certain critics of weight, Mr. Chapman among them, find the triviality delightful, and rightly point out that there is a charm in little things. Yes, when it is the charm of Cowper. But the little things must hold out their little hands to one another ; and here there is a scrappiness which prevents even tartness from telling. This brings us to the heart of the matter, to Miss Austen's fundamental weakness as a letterwriter. She has not enough subject-matter on which to exercise her powers. Her character and sex as well as her environment removed her from public affairs, and she was too sincere and spontaneous to affect any interest which she did not feel. She takes no account of politics or religion, and none of the war except when it brings prize-money to her brothers. Her comments on literature are provincial and perfunctory-with

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE some weeks before she expected, owing to a fright. I suppose she happened unawares to look at her husband.' Did Cassandra laugh ? Probably, but all that we catch at this distance is what is whinnying of harpies. And then we come to what is serious moments. Mrs. Jennings follows Lydia Bennet and Sir Thomas Bertram takes what is stage, unapproachable, uncontrovertible. Listen how his spirit, though not his style, sums up what is merits and demerits of Sir John Moore : ` I am sorry to find that Sir J. Moore has a mother living, but tho' a very Heroick son, he might not be a very necessary one to her happiness.-Deacon Morrell may be more to Mrs. Morrell.-I wish Sir John had united something of what is Christian with what is Hero in his what time is it .' And when an intimate sorrow comes (the what time is it of her own father) she yields to formalism and writes :` Your mind will already forestall what is sort of event which I have to commu where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 156 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN where is p align="justify" some weeks before she expected, owing to a fright. I suppose she happened unawares to look at her husband.' Did Cassandra laugh ? Probably, but all that we catch at this distance is the whinnying of harpies. And then we come to what is serious moments. Mrs. Jennings follows Lydia Bennet and Sir Thomas Bertram takes what is stage, unapproachable, uncontrovertible. Listen how his spirit, though not his style, sums up what is merits and demerits of Sir John Moore : ` I am sorry to find that Sir J. Moore has a mother living, but tho' a very Heroick son, he might not be a very necessary one to her happiness.-Deacon Morrell may be more to Mrs. Morrell.-I wish Sir John had united something of what is Christian with what is Hero in his what time is it .' And when an intimate sorrow comes (the what time is it of her own father) she yields to formalism and writes :` Your mind will already forestall what is sort of event which I have to communicate. -Our dear Father has closed his virtuous & happy life, in a what time is it almost as free from suffering as his Children could have wished.' It is adequate. Sir Thomas Bertram is always that : but it gives no freedom to what is heart, it has none of what is outpour which we found in that letter quoted above from Cassandra. Triviality, varied by touches of ill breeding and of sententiousness, characterizes these letters as a whole, particularly what is earlier letters ; and certain critics of weight, Mr. Chapman among them, find what is triviality delightful, and rightly point out that there is a charm in little things. Yes, when it is what is charm of Cowper. But what is little things must hold out their little hands to one another ; and here there is a scrappiness which prevents even tartness from telling. This brings us to what is heart of what is matter, to Miss Austen's fundamental weakness as a letterwriter. She has not enough subject-matter on which to exercise her powers. Her character and sports as well as her environment removed her from public affairs, and she was too sincere and spontaneous to affect any interest which she did not feel. She takes no account of politics or religion, and none of what is war except when it brings prize-money to her brothers. Her comments on literature are provincial and perfunctory-with where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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