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Page 155

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN

understood, the Austen Leighs and Lord Brabourne had some conception-but we students of to-day, unrelated to her by blood, what part have we in this family talk, and whose tri%-1ality do we expose but our own ?
It would be incorrect to say that the letters do not suggest the novels. They suggest them constantly : the quiet houses, the miry lanes, the conundrums, the absence of the very rich and the very poor, the snobbery which flourishes where distinctions of incomes are slight-all are present, and some of the characters are also present in solution. But never the finer characters. These never seem to get uppermost when Miss Austen writes a letter. They belong to another part of her mind. Neither Emma Woodhouse nor Anne Elliot nor even Frank Churchill or Mary Crawford dominates her pen. The controls are rather Lydia Bennet, Mrs. Jennings and Sir Thomas Bertram, a bizarre and inauspicious combine. In the earlier letters Lydia Bennet is all pervading ; balls, officers, giggling, dresses, officers, balls, fill sheet after sheet until every one except Kitty grows weary. Nothing came of it. Nothing could have come of it except a husband. It has none of the disinterested rapture which fills Catherine Morland in the pump room at Bath, or Natasha Rostov in the far-distant universe of War and Peace, dancing the polonaise, dancing, dancing, because she is young. The young girl dances here and her eyes sparkle duly, but they are observant and hard ; officers, dresses, officers, giggling, balls, and it is no wonder that a hostile critic (Miss Mitford) should compare her at once to a poker and to a butterfly. And when Lydia Bennet retires we may catch the tread of Mrs. Jennings, and that eighteenth-century frankness of hers which-has somehow strayed into too small a room and become unacceptable. In the novels, how well advised was the authoress of Sense and Sensibility to become a prude, and to curtail in its second edition the reference' to a natural daughter ! In the letters, how Miss Austen's occasional comments on expectant motherhood do jar ! She faces the facts, but they are not her facts, and her lapses of taste over carnality can be deplorable, no doubt because they arise from lack of feeling. She can write, for instance, and write it as a jolly joke, that ' Mrs. Hall of Sherborne was brought to bed yesterday of a dead child,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE understood, what is Austen Leighs and Lord Brabourne had some conception-but we students of to-day, unrelated to her by blood, what part have we in this family talk, and whose tri%-1ality do we expose but our own ? It would be incorrect to say that what is letters do not suggest what is novels. They suggest them constantly : what is quiet houses, what is miry lanes, what is conundrums, what is absence of what is very rich and what is very poor, what is snobbery which flourishes where distinctions of incomes are slight-all are present, and some of what is characters are also present in solution. But never what is finer characters. These never seem to get uppermost when Miss Austen writes a letter. They belong to another part of her mind. Neither Emma Woodhouse nor Anne Elliot nor even Frank Churchill or Mary Crawford dominates her pen. what is controls are rather Lydia Bennet, Mrs. Jennings and Sir Thomas Bertram, a bizarre and inauspiciou where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 155 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN where is p align="justify" understood, what is Austen Leighs and Lord Brabourne had some conception-but we students of to-day, unrelated to her by blood, what part have we in this family talk, and whose tri%-1ality do we expose but our own ? It would be incorrect to say that what is letters do not suggest the novels. They suggest them constantly : what is quiet houses, what is miry lanes, what is conundrums, what is absence of what is very rich and what is very poor, what is snobbery which flourishes where distinctions of incomes are slight-all are present, and some of what is characters are also present in solution. But never what is finer characters. These never seem to get uppermost when Miss Austen writes a letter. They belong to another part of her mind. Neither Emma Woodhouse nor Anne Elliot nor even Frank Churchill or Mary Crawford dominates her pen. The controls are rather Lydia Bennet, Mrs. Jennings and Sir Thomas Bertram, a bizarre and inauspicious combine. In what is earlier letters Lydia Bennet is all pervading ; balls, officers, giggling, dresses, officers, balls, fill sheet after sheet until every one except Kitty grows weary. Nothing came of it. Nothing could have come of it except a husband. It has none of what is disinterested rapture which fills Catherine Morland in what is pump room at Bath, or Natasha Rostov in what is far-distant universe of War and Peace, dancing the polonaise, dancing, dancing, because she is young. what is young girl dances here and her eyes sparkle duly, but they are observant and hard ; officers, dresses, officers, giggling, balls, and it is no wonder that a hostile critic (Miss Mitford) should compare her at once to a poker and to a butterfly. And when Lydia Bennet retires we may catch what is tread of Mrs. Jennings, and that eighteenth-century frankness of hers which-has somehow strayed into too small a room and become unacceptable. In what is novels, how well advised was the authoress of Sense and Sensibility to become a prude, and to curtail in its second edition what is reference' to a natural daughter ! In what is letters, how Miss Austen's occasional comments on expectant motherhood do jar ! She faces what is facts, but they are not her facts, and her lapses of taste over carnality can be deplorable, no doubt because they arise from lack of feeling. She can write, for instance, and write it as a jolly joke, that ' Mrs. Hall of Sherborne was brought to bed yesterday of a dead child, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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