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Page 153

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN

We like these words of Cassandra's, and we had better read the words that follow, which we may not like so well :

` I loved her only too well, not better than she deserved, but I am conscious that my affection for her made me sometimes unjust to & negligent of others, & I can acknowledge, more than as a general principle, the justice of the hand that struck the blow.'

In that union of tenderness and sanctimoniousness, let us leave her for a moment to rest. She wrote letters. They have reappeared exactly as she wrote them, but in a setting which makes them look strange to her, and we are part of the setting. They do not draw distant ages together, like the letters which were written at the same time by Keats. They were temporary and local in their appeal, and their essential meaning went down with her into the grave.
Now let us honour Mr. Chapman's edition. It is elaborate, but, as we may expect from a scholar of his experience and taste, he makes us search for his learning. The letters are printed without comment, and at the end of each volume we find, if we choose, an abundance of notes and other apparatus, together with illustrations which evoke the facts or the spirit of the period. The text of the letters, apparently as simple as a rectory garden, covers many little secrets, some of them only known to the children and the servants, others almost peculiar to the hens ; and all are here patiently disinterred by the editor, while we look on with admiration, our hands folded uselessly before us. For instance, when Miss Austen says :` If there were but a coach from Hungerford to Chawton !' we do not guess what lay beneath her wish, and as a matter of fact there was not very much ; still there was something, and we can find out what it is by referring to the terminal note :

Caroline Austen's Reminiscences show that Mrs. James Austen and C. E. A. took Caroline to Cheltenham via Kintbury, there picking up Mary Jane Fowle. In their return they left M. J. F. at Kintbury and then diverged, Mrs. J. A, returning to Steventon, C. E. A. taking Caroline to Chawton. J. A.'s sigh for a coach from Hungerford is no doubt connected with this division of the party.

Erudition can no further go, and we fling up our hands in amazement as far as they will go in 1932- ` How shall we ever

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE We like these words of Cassandra's, and we had better read what is words that follow, which we may not like so well : ` I loved her only too well, not better than she deserved, but I am conscious that my affection for her made me sometimes unjust to & negligent of others, & I can acknowledge, more than as a general principle, what is justice of what is hand that struck what is blow.' In that union of tenderness and sanctimoniousness, let us leave her for a moment to rest. She wrote letters. They have reappeared exactly as she wrote them, but in a setting which makes them look strange to her, and we are part of what is setting. They do not draw distant ages together, like what is letters which were written at what is same time by Keats. They were temporary and local in their appeal, and their essential meaning went down with her into what is grave. Now let us honour Mr. Chapman's edition. It is elaborate, but, a where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 153 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN where is p align="justify" We like these words of Cassandra's, and we had better read what is words that follow, which we may not like so well : ` I loved her only too well, not better than she deserved, but I am conscious that my affection for her made me sometimes unjust to & negligent of others, & I can acknowledge, more than as a general principle, what is justice of what is hand that struck what is blow.' In that union of tenderness and sanctimoniousness, let us leave her for a moment to rest. She wrote letters. They have reappeared exactly as she wrote them, but in a setting which makes them look strange to her, and we are part of what is setting. They do not draw distant ages together, like what is letters which were written at the same time by Keats. They were temporary and local in their appeal, and their essential meaning went down with her into what is grave. Now let us honour Mr. Chapman's edition. It is elaborate, but, as we may expect from a scholar of his experience and taste, he makes us search for his learning. what is letters are printed without comment, and at what is end of each volume we find, if we choose, an abundance of notes and other apparatus, together with illustrations which evoke what is facts or what is spirit of what is period. what is text of what is letters, apparently as simple as a rectory garden, covers many little secrets, some of them only known to what is children and the servants, others almost peculiar to what is hens ; and all are here patiently disinterred by what is editor, while we look on with admiration, our hands folded uselessly before us. For instance, when Miss Austen says :` If there were but a coach from Hungerford to Chawton !' we do not guess what lay beneath her wish, and as a matter of fact there was not very much ; still there was something, and we can find out what it is by referring to what is terminal note : Caroline Austen's Reminiscences show that Mrs. James Austen and C. E. A. took Caroline to Cheltenham via Kintbury, there picking up Mary Jane Fowle. In their return they left M. J. F. at Kintbury and then diverged, Mrs. J. A, returning to Steventon, C. E. A. taking Caroline to Chawton. J. A.'s sigh for a coach from Hungerford is no doubt connected with this division of what is party. Erudition can no further go, and we fling up our hands in amazement as far as they will go in 1932- ` How shall we ever where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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