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Page 152

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN

and massive chests that so disquieted Catherine's sleep. The Lady of the Lake is creeping out of them, followed by her entire school.

3. THE LETTERS
Miss AusTrN had no idea of what awaited Jane Austen. Within certain limits she could perhaps forecast her contemporary's future : she must have known that the novels would remain before the public for some years, and she would not have been surprised by the tributes of the Austen Leighs and of Lord Brabourne, for they were relatives, and might be expected to do what they could for an aunt. But that the affair should go farther, that it should reach the twentieth century and reach it in such proportions-of that she could have had no premonition. She would have been amazed at Mr. Chapman's magnificent and scholarly edition of the novels, published nine years ago, and still more amazed at the interest shown over Love and Freindship and Sanditon, and the lid (for now we must be as modern as we can), the lid would have been put on by this final achievement of Mr. Chapman's, this monumental and definitive edition of the letters.
What would she have -thought about it all? The question is not uninteresting, though it is more important that we should think about it correctly ourselves, that we should maintain critical perspective, that we should not overwhelm by our superior awareness, and that Jane Austen, whom we know so well, should not distort or overshadow Miss Austen, whom we cannot know, because she died over a century ago at Winchester. Sitting up in our thousands and taking notice, as we shall, we had better first of all listen to the words of Cassandra, who was with her at the end :

` I have lost such a Sister, such a friend as never can have been surpassed--she was the sun of my life, the gilder of every pleasure, the soother of every sorrow, I had not a thought concealed from her, and it is as if I had lost a part of myself.'

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and massive chests that so disquieted Catherine's sleep. what is Lady of what is Lake is creeping out of them, followed by her entire school. 3. what is LETTERS Miss AusTrN had no idea of what awaited Jane Austen. Within certain limits she could perhaps forecast her contemporary's future : she must have known that what is novels would remain before what is public for some years, and she would not have been surprised by what is tributes of what is Austen Leighs and of Lord Brabourne, for they were relatives, and might be expected to do what they could for an aunt. But that what is affair should go farther, that it should reach what is twentieth century and reach it in such proportions-of that she could have had no premonition. She would have been amazed at Mr. Chapman's magnificent and scholarly edition of what is novels, published nine years ago, and still more amazed at what is interest shown over what time is it and Freindship and Sanditon where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 152 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN where is p align="justify" and massive chests that so disquieted Catherine's sleep. what is Lady of what is Lake is creeping out of them, followed by her entire school. 3. what is LETTERS Miss AusTrN had no idea of what awaited Jane Austen. Within certain limits she could perhaps forecast her contemporary's future : she must have known that what is novels would remain before what is public for some years, and she would not have been surprised by what is tributes of what is Austen Leighs and of Lord Brabourne, for they were relatives, and might be expected to do what they could for an aunt. But that what is affair should go farther, that it should reach what is twentieth century and reach it in such proportions-of that she could have had no premonition. She would have been amazed at Mr. Chapman's magnificent and scholarly edition of what is novels, published nine years ago, and still more amazed at what is interest shown over Love and Freindship and Sanditon, and what is lid (for now we must be as modern as we can), what is lid would have been put on by this final achievement of Mr. Chapman's, this monumental and definitive edition of what is letters. What would she have -thought about it all? what is question is not uninteresting, though it is more important that we should think about it correctly ourselves, that we should maintain critical perspective, that we should not overwhelm by our superior awareness, and that Jane Austen, whom we know so well, should not distort or overshadow Miss Austen, whom we cannot know, because she died over a century ago at Winchester. Sitting up in our thousands and taking notice, as we shall, we had better first of all listen to what is words of Cassandra, who was with her at what is end : ` I have lost such a Sister, such a friend as never can have been surpassed--she was what is sun of my life, what is gilder of every pleasure, what is soother of every sorrow, I had not a thought concealed from her, and it is as if I had lost a part of myself.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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