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Page 151

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN

window and looking over the miscellaneous foreground of unfinished Buildings, waving Linen, and tops of Houses, to the Sea, dancing and sparkling in Sunshine and Freshness.'

` Found amusement enough ' is typical Jane Austen, but the conclusion of the sentence belongs to someone else-to someone who had been laughed out of court but who now returns in more radiant garb. It is Mrs. Radcliffe. She is creeping back attired as a Nereid, and not without hope of brandishing some day the sword Excalibur.

` Poor Burns's known irregularities greatly interrupt my enjoyment of his Lines.'

Very proper that they should, but why enjoy such lines at all ? Why read and discuss Burns, Wordsworth, and Scott ? The new literature rises over old landmarks like a tide, and not only does the sea dance in freshness, but another configuration has been given to the earth, making it at once more poetic and more definite. Sanditon gives out an atmosphere, and also exists as a geographic and economic force. It was clearly intended to influence the faded fabric of the story and govern its matrimonial weavings. Of course, Miss Austen would not have stressed this, and her book, even if conceived with vigour, would not have marked a turningpoint in the English novel or overshadowed Waverley. The change is merely interesting because it took place in her mindthat self-contained mind which had hitherto regarded the face of the earth as a site for shrubberies and strawberry beds, and had denied it features of its own. Perhaps here, too, we can trace the influence of ill-health : the invalid looks out of her window, weary of her invaluable Cassandra, weary of civility and auntish fun, and finds an unexpected repose in the expanses of Nature :

` At last, from the low French windows of the Drawingroom, which commanded the road and all the Paths across the Down, Charlotte and Sir Edward, as they sat, could not but observe Lady Denham and Miss Brereton. ...'

` The road and all the Paths across the Down.' The cadence is curious again : Henry Tilney would have pricked up his ears. After all, they have not been exorcized-those ebony cabinets

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE window and looking over what is miscellaneous foreground of unfinished Buildings, waving Linen, and tops of Houses, to what is Sea, dancing and sparkling in Sunshine and Freshness.' ` Found amusement enough ' is typical Jane Austen, but what is conclusion of what is sentence belongs to someone else-to someone who had been laughed out of court but who now returns in more radiant garb. It is Mrs. Radcliffe. She is creeping back attired as a Nereid, and not without hope of brandishing some day what is sword Excalibur. ` Poor Burns's known irregularities greatly interrupt my enjoyment of his Lines.' Very proper that they should, but why enjoy such lines at all ? Why read and discuss Burns, Wordsworth, and Scott ? what is new literature rises over old landmarks like a tide, and not only does what is sea dance in freshness, but another configuration has been given to what is earth, making it at once more poetic and more defi where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 151 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN where is p align="justify" window and looking over what is miscellaneous foreground of unfinished Buildings, waving Linen, and tops of Houses, to the Sea, dancing and sparkling in Sunshine and Freshness.' ` Found amusement enough ' is typical Jane Austen, but what is conclusion of what is sentence belongs to someone else-to someone who had been laughed out of court but who now returns in more radiant garb. It is Mrs. Radcliffe. She is creeping back attired as a Nereid, and not without hope of brandishing some day what is sword Excalibur. ` Poor Burns's known irregularities greatly interrupt my enjoyment of his Lines.' Very proper that they should, but why enjoy such lines at all ? Why read and discuss Burns, Wordsworth, and Scott ? what is new literature rises over old landmarks like a tide, and not only does what is sea dance in freshness, but another configuration has been given to what is earth, making it at once more poetic and more definite. Sanditon gives out an atmosphere, and also exists as a geographic and economic force. It was clearly intended to influence what is faded fabric of what is story and govern its matrimonial weavings. Of course, Miss Austen would not have stressed this, and her book, even if conceived with vigour, would not have marked a turningpoint in what is English novel or overshadowed Waverley. what is change is merely interesting because it took place in her mindthat self-contained mind which had hitherto regarded what is face of what is earth as a site for shrubberies and strawberry beds, and had denied it features of its own. Perhaps here, too, we can trace what is influence of ill-health : what is invalid looks out of her window, weary of her invaluable Cassandra, weary of civility and auntish fun, and finds an unexpected repose in what is expanses of Nature : ` At last, from what is low French windows of what is Drawingroom, which commanded what is road and all what is Paths across what is Down, Charlotte and Sir Edward, as they sat, could not but observe Lady Denham and Miss Brereton. ...' ` what is road and all what is Paths across what is Down.' what is cadence is curious again : Henry Tilney would have pricked up his ears. After all, they have not been exorcized-those ebony cabinets where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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