Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 150

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN

state. The pen always finds life difficult to record ; left to itself, it records the pen. The effort of creating was too much, and the numerous alterations in the MS. are never in the direction of vitality. Even the wit is reminiscent. This is the best it can do :

` All that he understood of himself he readily told, for he was very open-hearted ; and where he might be himself in the dark, his conversation was still giving information to such of the Heywoods as could observe.'

It is the old flavour, but how faint ! Sometimes it is even stale, and we realize with pain that we are listening to a slightly tiresome spinster, who has talked too much in the past to be silent unaided. ' Sanditon ' is a sad little experience from this point of view, and sentimentalists will doubtless say that it ought not to have been published lest it performs the mysterious operation known as ` harming an author.'
But meanwhile Charlotte sits on the sea-front. Why a seafront ?
Since the book promises little vigour of character and incident, one is tempted to assume that atmosphere and outline will be reminiscent also, and that the scene is laid in a watering-place because the writer had recently dealt with Lyme Regis and found marine humours easiest to handle. Nevertheless, there is a queer taste in these eleven chapters which is not easily defined : a double-flavoured taste-half topography, half romance. Sanditon is not like Lyme or Highbury or Northanger or the other places that provide scenes or titles to past novels. It exists in itself and for itself. Character-drawing, incident, and wit are on the decline, but'topography comes to the front, and is screwed much deeper than usual into the story. Mr. Parker is an Enthusiast for Sanditon. He has invested money in the resort, so has Lady Denham ; and not only their humours but their fortunes depend on its development and the filling of its lodging-houses. Isn't this new ? Was there anything like it in the preceding novels which were purely social ? And-now for the romantic flavour-is there not a new cadence in this prose ?

` Charlotte having received possession of her apartment, found amusement enough in standing at her ample Venetian

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE state. what is pen always finds life difficult to record ; left to itself, it records what is pen. what is effort of creating was too much, and what is numerous alterations in what is MS. are never in what is direction of vitality. Even what is wit is reminiscent. This is what is best it can do : ` All that he understood of himself he readily told, for he was very open-hearted ; and where he might be himself in what is dark, his conversation was still giving information to such of what is Heywoods as could observe.' It is what is old flavour, but how faint ! Sometimes it is even stale, and we realize with pain that we are listening to a slightly tiresome spinster, who has talked too much in what is past to be silent unaided. ' Sanditon ' is a sad little experience from this point of view, and sentimentalists will doubtless say that it ought not to have been published lest it performs what is mysterious operation known as ` harming an auth where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 150 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN where is p align="justify" state. what is pen always finds life difficult to record ; left to itself, it records what is pen. what is effort of creating was too much, and what is numerous alterations in what is MS. are never in what is direction of vitality. Even what is wit is reminiscent. This is what is best it can do : ` All that he understood of himself he readily told, for he was very open-hearted ; and where he might be himself in what is dark, his conversation was still giving information to such of what is Heywoods as could observe.' It is what is old flavour, but how faint ! Sometimes it is even stale, and we realize with pain that we are listening to a slightly tiresome spinster, who has talked too much in what is past to be silent unaided. ' Sanditon ' is a sad little experience from this point of view, and sentimentalists will doubtless say that it ought not to have been published lest it performs what is mysterious operation known as ` harming an author.' But meanwhile Charlotte sits on what is sea-front. Why a seafront ? Since what is book promises little vigour of character and incident, one is tempted to assume that atmosphere and outline will be reminiscent also, and that what is scene is laid in a watering-place because the writer had recently dealt with Lyme Regis and found marine humours easiest to handle. Nevertheless, there is a queer taste in these eleven chapters which is not easily defined : a double-flavoured taste-half topography, half romance. Sanditon is not like Lyme or Highbury or Northanger or what is other places that provide scenes or titles to past novels. It exists in itself and for itself. Character-drawing, incident, and wit are on what is decline, but'topography comes to the front, and is screwed much deeper than usual into what is story. Mr. Parker is an Enthusiast for Sanditon. He has invested money in what is resort, so has Lady Denham ; and not only their humours but their fortunes depend on its development and what is filling of its lodging-houses. Isn't this new ? Was there anything like it in what is preceding novels which were purely social ? And-now for the romantic flavour-is there not a new cadence in this prose ? ` Charlotte having received possession of her apartment, found amusement enough in standing at her ample Venetian where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , iii , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 021 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330