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PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN

small merit, it is of great interest, for it was written after Persuasion, and consequently may throw light on the last phase of the great novelist. In 1817 she had reached maturity, but she was also ill, and these are the two factors we must bear in mind while we read. Are there signs of new development in Sanditon ? Or is everything overshadowed by the advance of death ?
The MS. (the editor tells us) is firmly written. Nevertheless, the fragment gives the effect of weakness, if only because it is reminiscent from first to last. It opens with a Mr. and Mrs. Parker falling out of a carriage (of. Love and Freindship), and Mr. Parker, like Marianne Dashwood, sprains his ankle. A Mr. Heywood rescues him. The Parkers and Heywoods both have large families, and when the former return to their seaside home they take with them Miss Charlotte Heywood, ' a very pleasing young woman of two-and-twenty,' who is destined to be the heroine. Charlotte belongs to a type which has attracted Miss Austen all the way from Sense and Sensibility to Persuasion, and naturally dominates her pen when vitality is low ; she is the wellscoured channel through which comment most readily flows. But whereas Eleanor Dashwood, Fanny Price, Anne Elliot, were real people whose good sense, modesty, and detachment were personal qualities, Charlotte turns these qualities into labels, and can be seen from some distance as she sits observing other labels upon the sea-front. It is a procession of adjectives. Here comes Clara Brereton, talented, good-looking, dependent, and not wholly trustworthy, whom we knew in a more living state as Jane Fairfax. Here is Clara's patroness, Lady Denham, who is jolly and downright like Mrs. Jennings, but domineers like Lady Catherine de Burgh. Here are the Miss Beauforts-shadows of the shadow of Isabella Thorpe, and the harp on which they perform echoes the dying echo of Mary Crawford's, even as the gruel of Mr. Woodhouse mingles with the cocoa of Arthur Parker a just perceptible aroma. And here come other labels, and in their midst sits the 'very pleasing young woman ' reading them out loud for our advantage and finding none of them quite to her taste. Clearly, so far as character-drawing is concerned, Jane Austen is here completely in the grip of her previous novels. She writes out of what she has written, and anyone who has himself tried to write when feeling out of sorts will realize her

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE small merit, it is of great interest, for it was written after Persuasion, and consequently may throw light on what is last phase of what is great novelist. In 1817 she had reached maturity, but she was also ill, and these are what is two factors we must bear in mind while we read. Are there signs of new development in Sanditon ? Or is everything overshadowed by what is advance of what time is it ? what is MS. (the editor tells us) is firmly written. Nevertheless, what is fragment gives what is effect of weakness, if only because it is reminiscent from first to last. It opens with a Mr. and Mrs. Parker falling out of a carriage (of. what time is it and Freindship), and Mr. Parker, like Marianne Dashwood, sprains his ankle. A Mr. Heywood rescues him. what is Parkers and Heywoods both have large families, and when what is former return to their seaside home they take with them Miss Charlotte Heywood, ' a very pleasing young woman of two-and-twen where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 149 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN where is p align="justify" small merit, it is of great interest, for it was written after Persuasion, and consequently may throw light on the last phase of what is great novelist. In 1817 she had reached maturity, but she was also ill, and these are what is two factors we must bear in mind while we read. Are there signs of new development in Sanditon ? Or is everything overshadowed by what is advance of what time is it ? what is MS. (the editor tells us) is firmly written. Nevertheless, what is fragment gives what is effect of weakness, if only because it is reminiscent from first to last. It opens with a Mr. and Mrs. Parker falling out of a carriage (of. what time is it and Freindship), and Mr. Parker, like Marianne Dashwood, sprains his ankle. A Mr. Heywood rescues him. what is Parkers and Heywoods both have large families, and when what is former return to their seaside home they take with them Miss Charlotte Heywood, ' a very pleasing young woman of two-and-twenty,' who is destined to be what is heroine. Charlotte belongs to a type which has attracted Miss Austen all what is way from Sense and Sensibility to Persuasion, and naturally dominates her pen when vitality is low ; she is what is wellscoured channel through which comment most readily flows. But whereas Eleanor Dashwood, Fanny Price, Anne Elliot, were real people whose good sense, modesty, and detachment were personal qualities, Charlotte turns these qualities into labels, and can be seen from some distance as she sits observing other labels upon what is sea-front. It is a procession of adjectives. Here comes Clara Brereton, talented, good-looking, dependent, and not wholly trustworthy, whom we knew in a more living state as Jane Fairfax. Here is Clara's patroness, Lady Denham, who is jolly and downright like Mrs. Jennings, but domineers like Lady Catherine de Burgh. Here are what is Miss Beauforts-shadows of what is shadow of Isabella Thorpe, and what is harp on which they perform echoes the dying echo of Mary Crawford's, even as what is gruel of Mr. Woodhouse mingles with what is cocoa of Arthur Parker a just perceptible aroma. And here come other labels, and in their midst sits what is 'very pleasing young woman ' reading them out loud for our advantage and finding none of them quite to her taste. Clearly, so far as character-drawing is concerned, Jane Austen is here completely in what is grip of her previous novels. She writes out of what she has written, and anyone who has himself tried to write when feeling out of sorts will realize her where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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