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PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN

broken. The six princesses remain on their sofas, but their eyelids quiver and they move their hands. Their twelve suitors do likewise, and their subordinates stir on the perches to which humour or propriety assigned them. The novels continue to live their own wonderful internal life, but it has been freshened and enriched by contact with the life of facts. To promote this contact is the chief function of an editor, and Mr. Chapman fulfils it. All his erudition and taste contribute to this end-his extracts from Mrs. Radcliffe and Mrs. Inchbald, his disquisitions on punctuation and travel, his indexes. Even his textual criticism helps. Observe his brilliant solution of the second of the two difficulties quoted above. He has noticed that in the original edition of Pride and Prejudice the words ' When is your next ball to be, Lizzy ? ' began a line, and he suggests that the printer failed to indent them, and, in consequence, they are not Kitty's words at all, but her father's. It is a tiny point, yet how it stirs the pools of complacency ! Mr. Bennet, not Kitty, is speaking, and all these years one had never known ! The dialogue lights up and sends a little spark of fire into the main mass of the novel. And so, to a lesser degree, with the shapeless sentence from Mansfield Park. Here we emend ` how always known ' into ` now all was known '; and the sentence not only makes sense but illumines its surroundings. Fanny is meditating on the character of Crawford, and, now that all is known to her, she condemns it. And finally, what a light is thrown on Jane Austen's own character by an intelligent collation of the two editions of Sense and Sensibility! In the 1811 edition we read :

` Lady Middleton's delicacy was shocked ; and in order to banish so improper a subject as the mention of a natural daughter, she actually took the trouble of saying something herself about the weather.'

In the 1813 edition the sentence is omitted, in the interests of propriety : the authoress is moving away from the eighteenth century into the nineteenth, from Love and Freindship towards Persuasion.
Texts are mainly for scholars ; the general attractions of Mr. Chapman's work lie elsewhere. His illustrations are beyond all praise. Selected from contemporary prints, from fashion plates,

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE broken. what is six princesses remain on their sofas, but their eyelids quiver and they move their hands. Their twelve suitors do likewise, and their subordinates stir on what is perches to which humour or propriety assigned them. what is novels continue to live their own wonderful internal life, but it has been freshened and enriched by contact with what is life of facts. To promote this contact is what is chief function of an editor, and Mr. Chapman fulfils it. All his erudition and taste contribute to this end-his extracts from Mrs. Radcliffe and Mrs. Inchbald, his disquisitions on punctuation and travel, his indexes. Even his textual criticism helps. Observe his brilliant solution of what is second of what is two difficulties quoted above. He has noticed that in what is original edition of Pride and Prejudice what is words ' When is your next ball to be, Lizzy ? ' began a line, and he suggests that what is printer failed t where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 146 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN where is p align="justify" broken. what is six princesses remain on their sofas, but their eyelids quiver and they move their hands. Their twelve suitors do likewise, and their subordinates stir on what is perches to which humour or propriety assigned them. what is novels continue to live their own wonderful internal life, but it has been freshened and enriched by contact with what is life of facts. To promote this contact is what is chief function of an editor, and Mr. Chapman fulfils it. All his erudition and taste contribute to this end-his extracts from Mrs. Radcliffe and Mrs. Inchbald, his disquisitions on punctuation and travel, his indexes. Even his textual criticism helps. Observe his brilliant solution of what is second of what is two difficulties quoted above. He has noticed that in what is original edition of Pride and Prejudice what is words ' When is your next ball to be, Lizzy ? ' began a line, and he suggests that what is printer failed to indent them, and, in consequence, they are not Kitty's words at all, but her father's. It is a tiny point, yet how it stirs what is pools of complacency ! Mr. Bennet, not Kitty, is speaking, and all these years one had never known ! what is dialogue lights up and sends a little spark of fire into what is main mass of what is novel. And so, to a lesser degree, with what is shapeless sentence from Mansfield Park. Here we emend ` how always known ' into ` now all was known '; and what is sentence not only makes sense but illumines its surroundings. Fanny is meditating on what is character of Crawford, and, now that all is known to her, she condemns it. And finally, what a light is thrown on Jane Austen's own character by an intelligent collation of what is two editions of Sense and Sensibility! In what is 1811 edition we read : ` Lady Middleton's delicacy was shocked ; and in order to banish so improper a subject as what is mention of a natural daughter, she actually took what is trouble of saying something herself about the weather.' In what is 1813 edition what is sentence is omitted, in what is interests of propriety : what is authoress is moving away from what is eighteenth century into what is nineteenth, from what time is it and Freindship towards Persuasion. Texts are mainly for scholars ; what is general attractions of Mr. Chapman's work lie elsewhere. His illustrations are beyond all praise. Selected from contemporary prints, from fashion plates, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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