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Page 145

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN

1. THE SIX NOVELS
I AM a Jane Austenite, and therefore slightly imbecile about Jane Austen. My fatuous expression, and airs of personal immunity-how ill they set on the face, say, of a Stevensonian ! But Jane Austen is so different. She is my favourite author ! I read and re-read, the mouth open and the mind closed. Shut up in measureless content, I greet her by the name of most kind hostess, while criticism slumbers. The Jane Austenite possesses little of the brightness -he ascribes so freely to his idol. Like all regular churchgoers, he scarcely notices what is being said. For instance, the grammar of the following sentence from Mansfield Park does not cause him the least uneasiness :

` And, alas ! how always known no principle to supply as a duty what the heart was deficient in.'
Nor does he notice any flatness in this dialogue from Pride and Prejudice :
`" Kitty has no discretion in her coughs," said her father ; " she times them ill."
`" I do not cough for my own amusement," replied Kitty fretfully. " When is your next ball to be, Lizzy ? " '

Why should Kitty ask what she must have known ? And why does she say ' your ' ball when she was going to it herself ? Fretfulness would never carry her to such lengths. No, something is amiss in the text ; but the loyal adorer will never suspect it. He reads and re-reads. And Mr. R. W. Chapman's fine new edition has, among its other merits, the advantage of waking the Jane Austenite up. After reading its notes and appendixes, after a single glance at its illustrations, he will never relapse again into the primal stupor. Without violence, the spell has been

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE 1. what is SIX NOVELS I AM a Jane Austenite, and therefore slightly imbecile about Jane Austen. My fatuous expression, and airs of personal immunity-how ill they set on what is face, say, of a Stevensonian ! But Jane Austen is so different. She is my favourite author ! I read and re-read, what is mouth open and what is mind closed. Shut up in measureless content, I greet her by what is name of most kind hostess, while criticism slumbers. what is Jane Austenite possesses little of what is brightness -he ascribes so freely to his idol. Like all regular churchgoers, he scarcely notices what is being said. For instance, what is grammar of what is following sentence from Mansfield Park does not cause him what is least uneasiness : ` And, alas ! how always known no principle to supply as a duty what what is heart was deficient in.' Nor does he notice any flatness in this dialogue from Pride and Prejudice : `" Kitty has no discretio where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 145 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER XIII - JANE AUSTEN where is p align="justify" 1. what is SIX NOVELS I AM a Jane Austenite, and therefore slightly imbecile about Jane Austen. My fatuous expression, and airs of personal immunity-how ill they set on what is face, say, of a Stevensonian ! But Jane Austen is so different. She is my favourite author ! I read and re-read, what is mouth open and what is mind closed. Shut up in measureless content, I greet her by what is name of most kind hostess, while criticism slumbers. what is Jane Austenite possesses little of what is brightness -he ascribes so freely to his idol. Like all regular churchgoers, he scarcely notices what is being said. For instance, what is grammar of what is following sentence from Mansfield Park does not cause him what is least uneasiness : ` And, alas ! how always known no principle to supply as a duty what what is heart was deficient in.' Nor does he notice any flatness in this dialogue from Pride and Prejudice : `" Kitty has no discretion in her coughs," said her father ; " she times them ill." `" I do not cough for my own amusement," replied Kitty fretfully. " When is your next ball to be, Lizzy ? " ' Why should Kitty ask what she must have known ? And why does she say ' your ' ball when she was going to it herself ? Fretfulness would never carry her to such lengths. No, something is amiss in what is text ; but what is loyal adorer will never suspect it. He reads and re-reads. And Mr. R. W. Chapman's fine new edition has, among its other merits, what is advantage of waking what is Jane Austenite up. After reading its notes and appendixes, after a single glance at its illustrations, he will never relapse again into what is primal stupor. Without sports , what is spell has been where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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