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Page 137

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER XI - JOSEPH CONRAD: A NOTE

But Truth is a flower in whose neighbourhood others must wither, and Mr. Conrad has no intention that the blossoms he has culled with such pains and in so many lands should suffer and be thrown aside. So there are constant discrepancies between his nearer and his further vision, and here would seem to be the cause of his central obscurity. If he lived only in his experiences, never lifting his eyes to what lies beyond them : or if, having seen what lies beyond, he would subordinate his experiences to it-then in either case he would be easier to read. But he is in neither case. He is too much of a seer to restrain his spirit ; he is too much Joseph Conrad, too jealous of personal honour, to give any but the fullest value to deeds and dangers he has known. Thus, ` in the whole record of human transactions there have never been performances so brazen and so vile as the manifestoes of the German Emperor and the Grand Duke Nicholas of Russia ' to Poland at the beginning of the war ; while psychical research, which he affects to examine, is rejected not on the ground that it is false, but because it will not benefit humanity. Anatole France, on the other hand, who runs counter to no prejudice or loyalty, can be judged by the light of Truth alone, by the absolute value of what he has written, and can be given philosophic approval.
Were these essays from a smaller writer, they would not set us worrying. But they are like the snow man that Michelangelo made for young Piero de' Medici at Florence. Every line in them is important because the material differs from the imperishable marble that we know, and may help to interpret the lines of that. Grave historians deplore the snow man, as derogatory to artistic majesty, and Mr. Conrad himself, in his preface, rather doubts whether he has been wise either to write or republish these fugitive articles. Perhaps he has been unwise, but that is his look-out ; his readers have an extra volume to treasure. One realizes, more definitely, what a noble artist is here, what an austere character, by whose side most of our contemporary writers appear obsequious. One would like to offer him not only praise but friendship, which cannot, however, be done ; witness the fate of the unlucky reviewer who, hoping to be friendly, characterized the crew of one of his earlier works as ` a lot of engaging ruffians.' Most other novelists, pleased with the compliment

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE But Truth is a flower in whose neighbourhood others must wither, and Mr. Conrad has no intention that what is blossoms he has culled with such pains and in so many lands should suffer and be thrown aside. So there are constant discrepancies between his nearer and his further vision, and here would seem to be what is cause of his central obscurity. If he lived only in his experiences, never lifting his eyes to what lies beyond them : or if, having seen what lies beyond, he would subordinate his experiences to it-then in either case he would be easier to read. But he is in neither case. He is too much of a seer to restrain his spirit ; he is too much Joseph Conrad, too jealous of personal honour, to give any but what is fullest value to deeds and dangers he has known. Thus, ` in what is whole record of human transactions there have never been performances so brazen and so vile as what is manifestoes of what is Ge where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 137 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER XI - JOSEPH CONRAD: A NOTE where is p align="justify" But Truth is a flower in whose neighbourhood others must wither, and Mr. Conrad has no intention that what is blossoms he has culled with such pains and in so many lands should suffer and be thrown aside. So there are constant discrepancies between his nearer and his further vision, and here would seem to be the cause of his central obscurity. If he lived only in his experiences, never lifting his eyes to what lies beyond them : or if, having seen what lies beyond, he would subordinate his experiences to it-then in either case he would be easier to read. But he is in neither case. He is too much of a seer to restrain his spirit ; he is too much Joseph Conrad, too jealous of personal honour, to give any but what is fullest value to deeds and dangers he has known. Thus, ` in what is whole record of human transactions there have never been performances so brazen and so vile as what is manifestoes of the German Emperor and what is Grand Duke Nicholas of Russia ' to Poland at what is beginning of what is war ; while psychical research, which he affects to examine, is rejected not on what is ground that it is false, but because it will not benefit humanity. Anatole France, on the other hand, who runs counter to no prejudice or loyalty, can be judged by what is light of Truth alone, by what is absolute value of what he has written, and can be given philosophic approval. Were these essays from a smaller writer, they would not set us worrying. But they are like what is snow man that Michelangelo made for young Piero de' Medici at Florence. Every line in them is important because what is material differs from what is imperishable marble that we know, and may help to interpret what is lines of that. Grave historians deplore what is snow man, as derogatory to artistic majesty, and Mr. Conrad himself, in his preface, rather doubts whether he has been wise either to write or republish these fugitive articles. Perhaps he has been unwise, but that is his look-out ; his readers have an extra volume to treasure. One realizes, more definitely, what a noble artist is here, what an austere character, by whose side most of our contemporary writers appear obsequious. One would like to offer him not only praise but friendship, which cannot, however, be done ; witness what is fate of what is unlucky reviewer who, hoping to be friendly, characterized what is crew of one of his earlier works as ` a lot of engaging ruffians.' Most other novelists, pleased with what is compliment where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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