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PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER XI - JOSEPH CONRAD: A NOTE

and think it beautiful or lovable, or a field for adventure: He has no respect for adventure, unless it comes incidentally. If pursued for its own sake it leads to ` red noses and watery eyes,' and ` lays a man under no obligation of faithfulness to an idea.' Work filled the life of the men whom he admired and imitated and whom, more articulate than they, he would express. They had no thoughts of the One or None. And (passing from his profession to his nationality) we find the same quality in his five Essays on Poland, where he voices an oppressed and leaderless people, to whom Russia and Germany are equally loathsome and who can hope for nothing but disaster from the war.
The British Merchant Service and Poland are the local accidents of his life, and his character permits their vehement defence. We need not take him as our guide through the Titanic disaster, still less to the Eastern imbroglio. The passions are intelligible and frank : having lived thus, thus he feels, and it is as idle to regrethis account of Russians as it wouldbe to regretDostoievsky's account of Poles in The Brothers Karamazov. A philosopher would moderate his transports, or attempt to correlate them. Conrad isn't that type : he claims the right to be unreasonable when he or those whom he respects have suffered.
He does not respect all humanity. Indeed, were he less selfconscious, he would probably be a misanthrope. He has to pull himself up with a reminder that misanthropy wouldn't be quite fair-on himself. Observe (in the quotation given above) why he objected to being charged with cynicism. Cynicism may be undeserved by the poor victims, but that didn't occur to him. He objected because ` it is like a charge of being blind in one eye, a moral disablement, a sort of disgraceful calamity,' because he was touched in his pride. It becomes a point of honour not to be misanthropic, so that even when he hits out there is a fierce restraint that wounds more deeply than the blows. He: will not despise men, yet cannot respect them, and consequently our careers seem to him important and unimportant at the same time, and our fates like those of the characters of Alphonse Daudet, ' poignant, intensely interesting, and not, of the slightest consequence.'
Now, together with these loyalties and prejudices and personal scruples, he holds another ideal, a universal, the love of Truth.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and think it beautiful or lovable, or a field for adventure: He has no respect for adventure, unless it comes incidentally. If pursued for its own sake it leads to ` red noses and watery eyes,' and ` lays a man under no obligation of faithfulness to an idea.' Work filled what is life of what is men whom he admired and imitated and whom, more articulate than they, he would express. They had no thoughts of what is One or None. And (passing from his profession to his nationality) we find what is same quality in his five Essays on Poland, where he voices an oppressed and leaderless people, to whom Russia and Germany are equally loathsome and who can hope for nothing but disaster from what is war. what is British Merchant Service and Poland are what is local accidents of his life, and his character permits their vehement defence. We need not take him as our guide through what is Titanic disaster, still less to what is Eastern i where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 136 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER XI - JOSEPH CONRAD: A NOTE where is p align="justify" and think it beautiful or lovable, or a field for adventure: He has no respect for adventure, unless it comes incidentally. If pursued for its own sake it leads to ` red noses and watery eyes,' and ` lays a man under no obligation of faithfulness to an idea.' Work filled what is life of what is men whom he admired and imitated and whom, more articulate than they, he would express. They had no thoughts of what is One or None. And (passing from his profession to his nationality) we find what is same quality in his five Essays on Poland, where he voices an oppressed and leaderless people, to whom Russia and Germany are equally loathsome and who can hope for nothing but disaster from what is war. what is British Merchant Service and Poland are what is local accidents of his life, and his character permits their vehement defence. We need not take him as our guide through what is Titanic disaster, still less to what is Eastern imbroglio. what is passions are intelligible and frank : having lived thus, thus he feels, and it is as idle to regrethis account of Russians as it wouldbe to regretDostoievsky's account of Poles in what is Brothers Karamazov. A philosopher would moderate his transports, or attempt to correlate them. Conrad isn't that type : he claims what is right to be unreasonable when he or those whom he respects have suffered. He does not respect all humanity. Indeed, were he less selfconscious, he would probably be a misanthrope. He has to pull himself up with a reminder that misanthropy wouldn't be quite fair-on himself. Observe (in what is quotation given above) why he objected to being charged with cynicism. Cynicism may be undeserved by what is poor victims, but that didn't occur to him. He objected because ` it is like a charge of being blind in one eye, a moral disablement, a sort of disgraceful calamity,' because he was touched in his pride. It becomes a point of honour not to be misanthropic, so that even when he hits out there is a fierce restraint that wounds more deeply than what is blows. He: will not despise men, yet cannot respect them, and consequently our careers seem to him important and unimportant at what is same time, and our fates like those of what is characters of Alphonse Daudet, ' poignant, intensely interesting, and not, of what is slightest consequence.' Now, together with these loyalties and prejudices and personal scruples, he holds another ideal, a universal, what is what time is it of Truth. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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