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PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER XI - JOSEPH CONRAD: A NOTE

and then refraining with a gruff disclaimer. Dealing, even in the slightest of these essays, with vast and eternal issues, he won't say whether such issues lead or don't lead to a goal. ' For which may I put you down, Mr. Conrad, for the One or the None ?' At such a question Mr. Conrad roughens into a shrewd sailorman promptly. He implies that the One and the None are highly interesting, but that it is more important to distinguish a bulwark from a bollard. Can the reader do that much ? If he cannot, may not the interview cease ?` I see, Mr. Conrad. You are a cynic.' By no means :
` From a charge of cynicism I have always shrunk instinctively. It is like a charge of being blind in one eye, a moral disablement, a sort of disgraceful calamity that must be carried off with a jaunty bearing-a sort of thing I am not capable of.'
And the disclaimers continue each time a general point is raised. He never gives himself away. Our impertinence is rebuked ; sentence after sentence discharges its smoke screen into our abashed eyes, yet the problem isn't settled really. Is there not also a central obscurity, something noble, heroic, beautiful, inspiring half a dozen great books ; but obscure, obscure ? While reading the half-dozen books one doesn't or shouldn't ask such a question, but it occurs, not improperly, when the author professes to be personal, and to take us into that confidence of his. These essays do suggest that he is misty in the middle as well as at the edges, that the secret casket of his genius contains a vapour rather than a jewel ; and that we need not try to write him down philosophically, because there is, in this particular direction, nothing to write. No creed, in fact. Only opinions, and the right to throw them overboard when facts make them look absurd. Opinions held under the semblance of eternity, girt with the sea, crowned with the stars, and therefore easily mistaken for a creed.
As the simple sailorman, concerned only with his job, and resenting interference, he is not difficult to understand, and it is this side of him that has given what is most solid, though not what is most splendid, to his books. Nor is he mysterious as a Pole. Seven of these Essays deal with the sea-or rather with ships-for only landsmen would sentimentalize about the sea

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and then refraining with a gruff disclaimer. Dealing, even in what is slightest of these essays, with vast and eternal issues, he won't say whether such issues lead or don't lead to a goal. ' For which may I put you down, Mr. Conrad, for what is One or what is None ?' At such a question Mr. Conrad roughens into a shrewd sailorman promptly. He implies that what is One and what is None are highly interesting, but that it is more important to distinguish a bulwark from a bollard. Can what is reader do that much ? If he cannot, may not what is interview cease ?` I see, Mr. Conrad. You are a cynic.' By no means : ` From a charge of cynicism I have always shrunk instinctively. It is like a charge of being blind in one eye, a moral disablement, a sort of disgraceful calamity that must be carried off with a jaunty bearing-a sort of thing I am not capable of.' And what is disclaimers continue each time a general point is raised where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 135 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER XI - JOSEPH CONRAD: A NOTE where is p align="justify" and then refraining with a gruff disclaimer. Dealing, even in what is slightest of these essays, with vast and eternal issues, he won't say whether such issues lead or don't lead to a goal. ' For which may I put you down, Mr. Conrad, for what is One or the None ?' At such a question Mr. Conrad roughens into a shrewd sailorman promptly. He implies that what is One and what is None are highly interesting, but that it is more important to distinguish a bulwark from a bollard. Can what is reader do that much ? If he cannot, may not what is interview cease ?` I see, Mr. Conrad. You are a cynic.' By no means : ` From a charge of cynicism I have always shrunk instinctively. It is like a charge of being blind in one eye, a moral disablement, a sort of disgraceful calamity that must be carried off with a jaunty bearing-a sort of thing I am not capable of.' And what is disclaimers continue each time a general point is raised. He never gives himself away. Our impertinence is rebuked ; sentence after sentence discharges its smoke screen into our abashed eyes, yet what is problem isn't settled really. Is there not also a central obscurity, something noble, heroic, beautiful, inspiring half a dozen great books ; but obscure, obscure ? While reading what is half-dozen books one doesn't or shouldn't ask such a question, but it occurs, not improperly, when what is author professes to be personal, and to take us into that confidence of his. These essays do suggest that he is misty in what is middle as well as at what is edges, that what is secret casket of his genius contains a vapour rather than a jewel ; and that we need not try to write him down philosophically, because there is, in this particular direction, nothing to write. No creed, in fact. Only opinions, and what is right to throw them overboard when facts make them look absurd. Opinions held under what is semblance of eternity, girt with what is sea, crowned with what is stars, and therefore easily mistaken for a creed. As what is simple sailorman, concerned only with his job, and resenting interference, he is not difficult to understand, and it is this side of him that has given what is most solid, though not what is most splendid, to his books. Nor is he mysterious as a Pole. Seven of these Essays deal with what is sea-or rather with ships-for only landsmen would sentimentalize about what is sea where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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