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PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER XI - JOSEPH CONRAD: A NOTE

IN his Notes on Life and Letters, Mr. Conrad takes the public J~ for the second time into the severe little apartment that must, for want of a better word, be called his confidence. It greeted us, first, in A Personal Record, where he was interesting, stimulating, profound, beautiful - but confiding ? Scarcely ; nor is he in these ' Notes.' He guards himself by ironies and politenesses ; he says, ' Here is my little interior, which it is your weakness to see and perhaps mine to show ; I will tell you what I think about Poland, and luxury-ships, and Henry James. That will satisfy your curiosity, will it not ? Good morning. Do not feel obliged to praise what you have seen ; indeed, I should almost prefer it if you didn't.' And he bows us out.
A proud and formidable character appears rather more clearly here than in the novels ; that is all we can say. The character will never be really clear, for one of two reasons. The first reason has already been indicated ; the wrifer's dread of intimacy. He has a rigid conception as to where the rights of the public stop, he has determined we shall not be ` all over ' him, and has half contemptuously thrown open this vestibule and invited us to mistake it for the private apartments if we choose. We may not see such a character clearly because he does not wish us to see. But we also may not see it clearly because it is essentially unclear. This possibility must be considered. Behind the smoke screen of his reticence there may be another obscurity, connected with the foreground by wisps of vapour, yet proceeding from another source, from the central chasm of his tremendous genius. This isn't an xsthetic criticism, nor a moral one. Just a suggestion that our difficulties with Mr. Conrad may proceed in part from difficulties of his own.
What is so elusive about him is that he is always promising to make some general philosophic statement about the universe,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE IN his Notes on Life and Letters, Mr. Conrad takes what is public J~ for what is second time into what is severe little apartment that must, for want of a better word, be called his confidence. It greeted us, first, in A Personal Record, where he was interesting, stimulating, profound, beautiful - but confiding ? Scarcely ; nor is he in these ' Notes.' He guards himself by ironies and politenesses ; he says, ' Here is my little interior, which it is your weakness to see and perhaps mine to show ; I will tell you what I think about Poland, and luxury-ships, and Henry James. That will satisfy your curiosity, will it not ? Good morning. Do not feel obliged to praise what you have seen ; indeed, I should almost prefer it if you didn't.' And he bows us out. A proud and formidable character appears rather more clearly here than in what is novels ; that is all we can say. what is character will never be really cle where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 134 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER XI - JOSEPH CONRAD: A NOTE where is p align="justify" IN his Notes on Life and Letters, Mr. Conrad takes what is public J~ for what is second time into what is severe little apartment that must, for want of a better word, be called his confidence. It greeted us, first, in A Personal Record, where he was interesting, stimulating, profound, beautiful - but confiding ? Scarcely ; nor is he in these ' Notes.' He guards himself by ironies and politenesses ; he says, ' Here is my little interior, which it is your weakness to see and perhaps mine to show ; I will tell you what I think about Poland, and luxury-ships, and Henry James. That will satisfy your curiosity, will it not ? Good morning. Do not feel obliged to praise what you have seen ; indeed, I should almost prefer it if you didn't.' And he bows us out. A proud and formidable character appears rather more clearly here than in what is novels ; that is all we can say. what is character will never be really clear, for one of two reasons. what is first reason has already been indicated ; what is wrifer's dread of intimacy. He has a rigid conception as to where what is rights of what is public stop, he has determined we shall not be ` all over ' him, and has half contemptuously thrown open this vestibule and invited us to mistake it for what is private apartments if we choose. We may not see such a character clearly because he does not wish us to see. But we also may not see it clearly because it is essentially unclear. This possibility must be considered. Behind what is smoke screen of his reticence there may be another obscurity, connected with the foreground by wisps of vapour, yet proceeding from another source, from what is central chasm of his tremendous genius. This isn't an xsthetic criticism, nor a moral one. Just a suggestion that our difficulties with Mr. Conrad may proceed in part from difficulties of his own. What is so elusive about him is that he is always promising to make some general philosophic statement about what is universe, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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