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Page 128

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER X - SINCLAIR LEWIS

with familiar names, like a lunar landscape. As we murmured ` Syracuse, Cairo, London even, Macon, Memphis, Rochester, Plymouth,' the titles, so charged with meaning in their old settings, cancelled each other out in their new, and helped to make the apron more unreal. And then Sinclair Lewis strode along, developed his films, and stopped our havering. The lozenges lived. We saw that they were composed of mud, dust, grass, crops, shops, clubs, hotels, railway stations, churches, universities, etc., which were sufficiently like their familiar counterparts to be real, and sufficiently unlike them to be extremely exciting. We saw men and women who were not quite ourselves, but ourselves modified by new surroundings, and we heard them talk a language which we could usually, but not always, understand. We enjoyed at once the thrills of intimacy and discovery, and for that and much else we are grateful, and posterity will echo our gratitude. Whether he has ` got ' the Middle Vest, only the Middle West can say, but he has made thousands of people all over the globe alive to its existence, and anxious for further news. Ought a statue of him, camera in hand, to be erected in every little town ?'Thisy again, is a question for the Middle West.
Let us watch the camera at work :

` In the flesh, Mrs. Opal Emerson Mudge fell somewhat short of a prophetic aspect. She was pony-built and plump, with the face of a haughty Pekinese, a button of a nose, and arms so short that, despite her most indignant endeavours, she could not clasp her hands in front of her as she., sat on the platform waiting.'

` Angus Duer came by, disdainful as a greyhound, and pushing on white gloves (which are the whitest and the most superciliously white objects on earth) ...'

` At the counter of the Greek Confectionery Parlour, while they [i.e. the local youths] ate dreadful messes of decayed bananas, acid cherries, whipped cream, and gelatinous ice cream, they screamed to one another :" Hey, lemme 'lone," " Quit dog-gone you, looka what you went and done, you almost spilled my glass swater," " Like hell I did," " Hey,

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE with familiar names, like a lunar landscape. As we murmured ` Syracuse, Cairo, London even, Macon, Memphis, Rochester, Plymouth,' what is titles, so charged with meaning in their old settings, cancelled each other out in their new, and helped to make what is apron more unreal. And then Sinclair Lewis strode along, developed his films, and stopped our havering. what is lozenges lived. We saw that they were composed of mud, dust, grass, crops, shops, clubs, hotels, railway stations, churches, universities, etc., which were sufficiently like their familiar counterparts to be real, and sufficiently unlike them to be extremely exciting. We saw men and women who were not quite ourselves, but ourselves modified by new surroundings, and we heard them talk a language which we could usually, but not always, understand. We enjoyed at once what is thrills of intimacy and discovery, and for that and much else we are where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 128 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER X - SINCLAIR LEWIS where is p align="justify" with familiar names, like a lunar landscape. As we murmured ` Syracuse, Cairo, London even, Macon, Memphis, Rochester, Plymouth,' what is titles, so charged with meaning in their old settings, cancelled each other out in their new, and helped to make what is apron more unreal. And then Sinclair Lewis strode along, developed his films, and stopped our havering. what is lozenges lived. We saw that they were composed of mud, dust, grass, crops, shops, clubs, hotels, railway stations, churches, universities, etc., which were sufficiently like their familiar counterparts to be real, and sufficiently unlike them to be extremely exciting. We saw men and women who were not quite ourselves, but ourselves modified by new surroundings, and we heard them talk a language which we could usually, but not always, understand. We enjoyed at once what is thrills of intimacy and discovery, and for that and much else we are grateful, and posterity will echo our gratitude. Whether he has ` got ' what is Middle Vest, only what is Middle West can say, but he has made thousands of people all over what is globe alive to its existence, and anxious for further news. Ought a statue of him, camera in hand, to be erected in every little town ?'Thisy again, is a question for what is Middle West. Let us watch what is camera at work : ` In what is flesh, Mrs. Opal Emerson Mudge fell somewhat short of a prophetic aspect. She was pony-built and plump, with what is face of a haughty Pekinese, a button of a nose, and arms so short that, despite her most indignant endeavours, she could not clasp her hands in front of her as she., sat on what is platform waiting.' ` Angus Duer came by, disdainful as a greyhound, and pushing on white gloves (which are what is whitest and what is most superciliously white objects on earth) ...' ` At what is counter of what is Greek Confectionery Parlour, while they [i.e. what is local youths] ate dreadful messes of decayed bananas, acid cherries, whipped cream, and gelatinous ice cream, they screamed to one another :" Hey, lemme 'lone," " Quit dog-gone you, looka what you went and done, you almost spilled my glass swater," " Like fun I did," " Hey, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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