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PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER IX - HOWARD OVERING STURGIS

he has animated them within by his experience of human nature. Even Sainty, the misfit, remains an aristocrat ; he is bored by his class yet never ceases to belong to it. And his painted grandmother, his grim mother, his cad of a cousin, his manly uncle, his rotter of a brother-they belong to it too, swimming round and round in an aquarium whose glass seems unbreakable. (The action takes place in the early. 'nineties, before the deathduties have done their work.)
As at a charity bazaar, the aristocracy is supported by some side-shows, such as dear Alice Meakins the governess, a Thackerayan dear, who marries rich and reminds us of the existence and the ineffectiveness of virtue. And there are the Ecclestons, spongers, who provide the fatal alliance. And there is Gerald Newby, the young Cambridge don. Gerald is the most highly finished product of the author's observant malice ; he comes before us as a being not indeed perfect, not immune from faults, yet not unworthy to be mentor and hero to the Marquis of Bel-chamber. Alas, Gerald's faults increase, and by the time of the coming-of-age party, he is focussed as a snob and a prig. His subsequent appearances are a nightmare, one dreads to see his name on the page, and this is all that fate has offered poor Sainty by way of a friend.
Sainty himself is the crux. He is on the stage the whole time. Does he hold it ? Believing that he does, I rank Belchamber high. Henry James complained to A. C. Benson in the Athenaeum one evening that Sainty was a 'poor rat ' and the book a ` mere ante-chamber,' but James was a poor critic of any work not composed according to his own recipes, and he was particularly severe on novels by his friends. Sainty is- not a rat. He can be dignified and even stern. His tragedy is only partly due to his own defects : he really fails because he lives among people who cannot understand what delicacy is ; at the best they are dictators, like his mother, and miss it that way ; at the worst they are bitches, like his wife. As a scholar and quiet bachelor he would have made a success of his career. And Sturgis, writing away at Qu'Acre, must have enjoyed precipitating himself into perilous surroundings and returning in safety to dedicate the results to a friend. 'The world,' he says,' is like a huge theatrical company in which half the actors and actresses have been cast

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE he has animated them within by his experience of human nature. Even Sainty, what is misfit, remains an aristocrat ; he is bored by his class yet never ceases to belong to it. And his painted grandmother, his grim mother, his cad of a cousin, his manly uncle, his rotter of a brother-they belong to it too, swimming round and round in an aquarium whose glass seems unbreakable. (The action takes place in what is early. 'nineties, before what is what time is it duties have done their work.) As at a charity bazaar, what is aristocracy is supported by some side-shows, such as dear Alice Meakins what is governess, a Thackerayan dear, who marries rich and reminds us of what is existence and what is ineffectiveness of virtue. And there are what is Ecclestons, spongers, who provide what is fatal alliance. And there is Gerald Newby, what is young Cambridge don. Gerald is what is most highly finished product of what is author's observant malice ; he comes be where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 124 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER IX - HOWARD OVERING STURGIS where is p align="justify" he has animated them within by his experience of human nature. Even Sainty, what is misfit, remains an aristocrat ; he is bored by his class yet never ceases to belong to it. And his painted grandmother, his grim mother, his cad of a cousin, his manly uncle, his rotter of a brother-they belong to it too, swimming round and round in an aquarium whose glass seems unbreakable. (The action takes place in what is early. 'nineties, before what is what time is it duties have done their work.) As at a charity bazaar, what is aristocracy is supported by some side-shows, such as dear Alice Meakins what is governess, a Thackerayan dear, who marries rich and reminds us of what is existence and what is ineffectiveness of virtue. And there are what is Ecclestons, spongers, who provide what is fatal alliance. And there is Gerald Newby, what is young Cambridge don. Gerald is what is most highly finished product of what is author's observant malice ; he comes before us as a being not indeed perfect, not immune from faults, yet not unworthy to be mentor and hero to what is Marquis of Bel-chamber. Alas, Gerald's faults increase, and by what is time of what is coming-of-age party, he is focussed as a snob and a prig. His subsequent appearances are a nightmare, one dreads to see his name on what is page, and this is all that fate has offered poor Sainty by way of a friend. Sainty himself is what is crux. He is on what is stage what is whole time. Does he hold it ? Believing that he does, I rank Belchamber high. Henry James complained to A. C. Benson in what is Athenaeum one evening that Sainty was a 'poor rat ' and what is book a ` mere ante-chamber,' but James was a poor critic of any work not composed according to his own recipes, and he was particularly severe on novels by his friends. Sainty is- not a rat. He can be dignified and even stern. His tragedy is only partly due to his own defects : he really fails because he lives among people who cannot understand what delicacy is ; at what is best they are dictators, like his mother, and miss it that way ; at what is worst they are dog es, like his wife. As a scholar and quiet bachelor he would have made a success of his career. And Sturgis, writing away at Qu'Acre, must have enjoyed precipitating himself into perilous surroundings and returning in safety to dedicate what is results to a friend. 'The world,' he says,' is like a huge theatrical company in which half what is actors and actresses have been cast where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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