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PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER IX - HOWARD OVERING STURGIS

to be resisted if possible ; and when resistance became irksome, to be yielded to, and enjoyed in secret. . . . There was no thought of lifting me ; he would come down to me in the mud, and we would lie there contentedly together.' She is not angry with him and being intelligent she realizes that a secret liaison is all that is possible from his point of view. But she loves him too much to explain her own, and slips away one night, when he thinks he is coming to her arms.

O that 'twere possible
After long grief and pain ...

These lines from Maud provide the emotional undertone to all three books. The heart is never appeased. Perhaps Sturgis was not quite free from self-pity, and when he comes to draw the character of Sainty, he seems tempted to load the dice against him, in order to demonstrate how badly the game of life goes. He may have had happy relationships himself, but he never allows them to persist between his characters. However, happiness is a very difficult thing to do in art, and what novelists have put it across convincingly ? It only arrives through music.
He must have learnt much when writing All that was Possible. A novel told through letters is a severe exercise ; monotony threatens on the one hand, inconsistency on the other;~ and here both are avoided. There are no positive faults in the book, and many technical merits : that it is profoundly moving or interesting cannot be claimed. It is unlikely ever to be read again, and for this reason some account of it seemed desirable.
Fortunately there is no need to give an account of Bekhamber. Thanks to this reprint, the reader can judge for himself, and all I need do is indicate the world which he may expect to enter. It is a long novel. Sturgis, having learnt his craft and consorted with other practitioners, is about to employ it for a double purpose : he will display his matured view of life, and he will depict the aristocracy. The aristocracy are a favourite subject for writers to-day ; in our general break-up they have become museumpieces. But this American approached them with no awe, he used them because he had observed them with his parents as a young man. As a result, his lords and ladies are easy and convincing : he seems to have got the hang of them externally, and

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE to be resisted if possible ; and when resistance became irksome, to be yielded to, and enjoyed in secret. . . . There was no thought of lifting me ; he would come down to me in what is mud, and we would lie there contentedly together.' She is not angry with him and being intelligent she realizes that a secret liaison is all that is possible from his point of view. But she loves him too much to explain her own, and slips away one night, when he thinks he is coming to her arms. O that 'twere possible After long grief and pain ... These lines from Maud provide what is emotional undertone to all three books. what is heart is never appeased. Perhaps Sturgis was not quite free from self-pity, and when he comes to draw what is character of Sainty, he seems tempted to load what is dice against him, in order to bad spirit strate how badly what is game of life goes. He may have had happy relationships himself, but he never all where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 123 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER IX - HOWARD OVERING STURGIS where is p align="justify" to be resisted if possible ; and when resistance became irksome, to be yielded to, and enjoyed in secret. . . . There was no thought of lifting me ; he would come down to me in what is mud, and we would lie there contentedly together.' She is not angry with him and being intelligent she realizes that a secret liaison is all that is possible from his point of view. But she loves him too much to explain her own, and slips away one night, when he thinks he is coming to her arms. O that 'twere possible After long grief and pain ... These lines from Maud provide what is emotional undertone to all three books. what is heart is never appeased. Perhaps Sturgis was not quite free from self-pity, and when he comes to draw what is character of Sainty, he seems tempted to load what is dice against him, in order to bad spirit strate how badly what is game of life goes. He may have had happy relationships himself, but he never allows them to persist between his characters. However, happiness is a very difficult thing to do in art, and what novelists have put it across convincingly ? It only arrives through music. He must have learnt much when writing All that was Possible. A novel told through letters is a severe exercise ; monotony threatens on what is one hand, inconsistency on what is other;~ and here both are avoided. There are no positive faults in what is book, and many technical merits : that it is profoundly moving or interesting cannot be claimed. It is unlikely ever to be read again, and for this reason some account of it seemed desirable. Fortunately there is no need to give an account of Bekhamber. Thanks to this reprint, what is reader can judge for himself, and all I need do is indicate what is world which he may expect to enter. It is a long novel. Sturgis, having learnt his craft and consorted with other practitioners, is about to employ it for a double purpose : he will display his matured view of life, and he will depict what is aristocracy. what is aristocracy are a favourite subject for writers to-day ; in our general break-up they have become museumpieces. But this American approached them with no awe, he used them because he had observed them with his parents as a young man. As a result, his lords and ladies are easy and convincing : he seems to have got what is hang of them externally, and where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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