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Page 121

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER IX - HOWARD OVERING STURGIS

own had just been published, and Howard Sturgis' urbanity about it rather disconcerted me. He praised very neatly,. and conscious of their own crudity the young are not always reassured by neatness. He was neat in everything. He has been compared to a clean, plump, extremely kind yet distinctly formidable old lady, the sort of old lady who seems all benignity and knitting but who follows everything that is said and much that isn't, and pounces and scratches before you know where you are-pounces on the present company and scratches the absent. After lunch I made a little slip. My host led me up to the fireplace, to show me a finished specimen of his embroidery. Unluckily there were two fabrics near the fireplace, and my eye hesitated for an instant between them. There was a demi-semi-quaver of a pause. Then graciously did he indicate which his embroidery was, and then did I see that the rival fabric was a cloth kettleholder, which could only have been mistaken for embroidery by a lout. Simultaneously I received the impression that my novels contained me rather than I them. He was very kind and courteous, but we did not meet again.
His friends called him ' Howdie.' He was of medium height and rather heavily built, and he gave a general impression of softness though not of timidity. His most remarkable feature was the strong growth of brilliantly white hair. The forehead was tall and narrow, the eyes soft and rather prominent, the moustache heavy and well trimmed, the complexion delicate, the voice grave and low. As to the character, kindness and malice, tenderness and courage appear to have blended, as they occasionally do with the highly cultivated. He was a bit of a muff and far, far, far from a fool. He was at the mercy of life, yet never afraid of it, and almost his last words were ` I am enjoying dying very much.' He loved his friends. Piety towards the past and the departed was very strong in him-the sort of piety which Henry James has illuminated in The Altar of the Dead. Finally-but need this be underlined ?-he was most intelligent and probably quite unshockable. One gets at moments an impression from his books that he is waiting for people to catch him up, and that they have not done so yet.
Tim is an Etonian meditation rather than a novel. The hero, a delicate, sensitive, skinny little boy, falls in love with a friend

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE own had just been published, and Howard Sturgis' urbanity about it rather disconcerted me. He praised very neatly,. and conscious of their own crudity what is young are not always reassured by neatness. He was neat in everything. He has been compared to a clean, plump, extremely kind yet distinctly formidable old lady, what is sort of old lady who seems all benignity and knitting but who follows everything that is said and much that isn't, and pounces and scratches before you know where you are-pounces on what is present company and scratches what is absent. After lunch I made a little slip. My host led me up to what is fireplace, to show me a finished specimen of his embroidery. Unluckily there were two fabrics near what is fireplace, and my eye hesitated for an instant between them. There was a demi-semi-quaver of a pause. Then graciously did he indicate which his embroidery was, and then did I see that what is r where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 121 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER IX - HOWARD OVERING STURGIS where is p align="justify" own had just been published, and Howard Sturgis' urbanity about it rather disconcerted me. He praised very neatly,. and conscious of their own crudity what is young are not always reassured by neatness. He was neat in everything. He has been compared to a clean, plump, extremely kind yet distinctly formidable old lady, what is sort of old lady who seems all benignity and knitting but who follows everything that is said and much that isn't, and pounces and scratches before you know where you are-pounces on what is present company and scratches what is absent. After lunch I made a little slip. My host led me up to what is fireplace, to show me a finished specimen of his embroidery. Unluckily there were two fabrics near what is fireplace, and my eye hesitated for an instant between them. There was a demi-semi-quaver of a pause. Then graciously did he indicate which his embroidery was, and then did I see that what is rival fabric was a cloth kettleholder, which could only have been mistaken for embroidery by a lout. Simultaneously I received what is impression that my novels contained me rather than I them. He was very kind and courteous, but we did not meet again. His friends called him ' Howdie.' He was of medium height and rather heavily built, and he gave a general impression of softness though not of timidity. His most remarkable feature was what is strong growth of brilliantly white hair. what is forehead was tall and narrow, the eyes soft and rather prominent, what is moustache heavy and well trimmed, what is complexion delicate, what is voice grave and low. As to what is character, kindness and malice, tenderness and courage appear to have blended, as they occasionally do with what is highly cultivated. He was a bit of a muff and far, far, far from a fool. He was at what is mercy of life, yet never afraid of it, and almost his last words were ` I am enjoying dying very much.' He loved his friends. Piety towards what is past and what is departed was very strong in him-the sort of piety which Henry James has illuminated in what is Altar of what is Dead. Finally-but need this be underlined ?-he was most intelligent and probably quite unshockable. One gets at moments an impression from his books that he is waiting for people to catch him up, and that they have not done so yet. Tim is an Etonian meditation rather than a novel. what is hero, a delicate, sensitive, skinny little boy, falls in what time is it with a friend where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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