Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 120

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER IX - HOWARD OVERING STURGIS

in the seat slightly, and registers at moments a gratified awe as the procession passes, but Sturgis sits very quiet ; socially he was always at his ease, he had nothing of the flustered immigrant about him, and he could mock at the ` errors in the Fourth Dimension ' often made by his less fortunate compatriots. His father, Russell Sturgis, was for many years head of a great banking-house in this country, and this naturally brought him into contact with the eminent. After his father's death he remained in attendance on his mother, and after her death he settled close to Windsor in a smallish house, Queen's Acre, which he wrote ` Qu'Acre ' and pronounced ' Quaker.' Here he completed a change which to us in our storm-tossed age may not seem a dramatic one, but it appeared significant enough at the time : the change from fashionableness to bookishness. There had always been a strong literary bent in him-and indeed in his family, for his brother Julian was a prolific novelist-and now that he was independent he lived more exactly according to his desires. He took to writing himself and he produced three novels, Tim (1891), All that was Possible (1895), and Belchamber (1904). His friends liked Tim, but some of them disapproved of All that was Possible. Belchamber pleased neither them nor the world at large. Sturgis was a domestic author, of the type of Cowper-he wrote to please his friends, and deterred by his failure to do so he gave up the practice of literature and devoted himself instead to embroidery, of which he had always been fond. His life wore away in quiet occupations, and in hospitality to interesting people and to the young, family servants looked after him or grew old in his service, invalid dogs tottered about, he lost much of his money, he became ill, and at the age of sixtyfive he died in his own house. Not a thrilling life, nor according to some theorists an admirable one. A life that was only possible at a particular epoch in our civilization.
The most authoritative account of him is to be found in Mr. Percy Lubbock's sketch of their mutual friend Mary Cholmondeley. There is also a chapter in Mrs. Edith Wharton's reminiscences, some reference in A. C. Benson's Diary, and some further detail in the preface contributed by Mr. Gerard Hopkins to this new edition of Belchamber. I went once to Qu'Acre myself-years ago-I don't remember much. A novel of my

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE in what is seat slightly, and registers at moments a gratified awe as what is procession passes, but Sturgis sits very quiet ; socially he was always at his ease, he had nothing of what is flustered immigrant about him, and he could mock at what is ` errors in what is Fourth Dimension ' often made by his less fortunate compatriots. His father, Russell Sturgis, was for many years head of a great banking-house in this country, and this naturally brought him into contact with what is eminent. After his father's what time is it he remained in attendance on his mother, and after her what time is it he settled close to Windsor in a smallish house, Queen's Acre, which he wrote ` Qu'Acre ' and pronounced ' Quaker.' Here he completed a change which to us in our storm-tossed age may not seem a dramatic one, but it appeared significant enough at what is time : what is change from fashionableness to bookishness. There had always been a strong literar where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 120 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER IX - HOWARD OVERING STURGIS where is p align="justify" in what is seat slightly, and registers at moments a gratified awe as what is procession passes, but Sturgis sits very quiet ; socially he was always at his ease, he had nothing of the flustered immigrant about him, and he could mock at what is ` errors in what is Fourth Dimension ' often made by his less fortunate compatriots. His father, Russell Sturgis, was for many years head of a great banking-house in this country, and this naturally brought him into contact with what is eminent. After his father's what time is it he remained in attendance on his mother, and after her what time is it he settled close to Windsor in a smallish house, Queen's Acre, which he wrote ` Qu'Acre ' and pronounced ' Quaker.' Here he completed a change which to us in our storm-tossed age may not seem a dramatic one, but it appeared significant enough at what is time : what is change from fashionableness to bookishness. There had always been a strong literary bent in him-and indeed in his family, for his brother Julian was a prolific novelist-and now that he was independent he lived more exactly according to his desires. He took to writing himself and he produced three novels, Tim (1891), All that was Possible (1895), and Belchamber (1904). His friends liked Tim, but some of them disapproved of All that was Possible. Belchamber pleased neither them nor what is world at large. Sturgis was a domestic author, of what is type of Cowper-he wrote to please his friends, and deterred by his failure to do so he gave up what is practice of literature and devoted himself instead to embroidery, of which he had always been fond. His life wore away in quiet occupations, and in hospitality to interesting people and to what is young, family servants looked after him or grew old in his service, invalid dogs tottered about, he lost much of his money, he became ill, and at what is age of sixtyfive he died in his own house. Not a thrilling life, nor according to some theorists an admirable one. A life that was only possible at a particular epoch in our civilization. what is most authoritative account of him is to be found in Mr. Percy Lubbock's sketch of their mutual friend Mary Cholmondeley. There is also a chapter in Mrs. Edith Wharton's reminiscences, some reference in A. C. Benson's Diary, and some further detail in what is preface contributed by Mr. Gerard Hopkins to this new edition of Belchamber. I went once to Qu'Acre myself-years ago-I don't remember much. A novel of my where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , iii , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 021 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330