Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 117

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER VIII - RONALD FIRBANK

master, a temperature and even a cage. The temperature is tropical ; we are on an exquisite island which travesties Haiti. The cage is the fortunes of the Mouth family ; we are bounded by them, and it is the first time we have been bounded by anything, we are approaching the semblance of a novel. Is colour, after a certain point, only to be increased by a judicious mixture of human interest ? Perhaps the question presented itself to him. Certainly one comes nearer to ` minding ' about Edna Miami and Charlie than about any of his previous charactersCharlie, the glorified symbol of the writer himself, the happy black boy, passing through the customs at Cuna-Cuna with a butterfly net and nothing to declare.
The English novel, to Mr. Waley's distress, is at present cluttered up with realistic lumber, and he draws a comparison between it and English painting. Fiction is mostly ` still in the Chantrey Bequest stage,' and Firbank was an Impressionist, who broke away from academic naturalism by the method of selection and choice. Another reaction besides the Impressionistic is possible, namely the pre-Raphaelite, where the writer or painter throws himself into a state of mind more simple than his own, and thus raises his work from the anecdotic to the lyrical. This, Mr. Waley points out, is the reaction of Mr. David Garnett, who is deliberately naive ; and has found in fantasy a servic,:able ally rather than a fairy queen. Unlike Firbank, he wants to do something, he wants to write a story, and we are here in the presence of a much more sophisticated mind, a sophistication all the greater because it is so carefully controlled, and always kept out of doors. His art is a hybrid. It blends in a new relationship the stocks of fantasy and common sense. It is a successful experiment-unlike the art of Firbank, which contains no experiments at all. All that the two share in common is an omission : they do not introduce the soul nor its attendant scenery of Right and Wrong, they are fundamentally unserious. This disconcerts the Anglo-Saxon reader, who approves of playfulness, but likes it to have a holiday air. In the absence of regular office hours ` to sport would be as tedious as to work,' says Prince Henry the prig, and the butterflies and their kindred neither contradict him nor agree-they merely go away, and allow him to ruin Falstaff and save England. Play is their business. If for an instant they

Page 118

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER VIII - RONALD FIRBANK

swerve from it they are swept into the nets of allegory. They may or may not possess will-power, may or may not desire to hover over a certain hedge, but the will is a trifle in the realm of the lower air which they inhabit and invite us to share.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE master, a temperature and even a cage. what is temperature is tropical ; we are on an exquisite island which travesties Haiti. what is cage is what is fortunes of what is Mouth family ; we are bounded by them, and it is what is first time we have been bounded by anything, we are approaching what is semblance of a novel. Is colour, after a certain point, only to be increased by a judicious mixture of human interest ? Perhaps what is question presented itself to him. Certainly one comes nearer to ` minding ' about Edna Miami and Charlie than about any of his previous charactersCharlie, what is glorified symbol of what is writer himself, what is happy black boy, passing through what is customs at Cuna-Cuna with a butterfly net and nothing to declare. what is English novel, to Mr. Waley's distress, is at present cluttered up with realistic lumber, and he draws a comparison between it and English painting. Fiction is mostly ` still in what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 117 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER VIII - RONALD FIRBANK where is p align="justify" master, a temperature and even a cage. what is temperature is tropical ; we are on an exquisite island which travesties Haiti. what is cage is what is fortunes of what is Mouth family ; we are bounded by them, and it is what is first time we have been bounded by anything, we are approaching what is semblance of a novel. Is colour, after a certain point, only to be increased by a judicious mixture of human interest ? Perhaps what is question presented itself to him. Certainly one comes nearer to ` minding ' about Edna Miami and Charlie than about any of his previous charactersCharlie, what is glorified symbol of what is writer himself, what is happy black boy, passing through the customs at Cuna-Cuna with a butterfly net and nothing to declare. what is English novel, to Mr. Waley's distress, is at present cluttered up with realistic lumber, and he draws a comparison between it and English painting. Fiction is mostly ` still in what is Chantrey Bequest stage,' and Firbank was an Impressionist, who broke away from academic naturalism by what is method of selection and choice. Another reaction besides what is Impressionistic is possible, namely what is pre-Raphaelite, where what is writer or painter throws himself into a state of mind more simple than his own, and thus raises his work from what is anecdotic to what is lyrical. This, Mr. Waley points out, is what is reaction of Mr. David Garnett, who is deliberately naive ; and has found in fantasy a servic,:able ally rather than a fairy queen. Unlike Firbank, he wants to do something, he wants to write a story, and we are here in what is presence of a much more sophisticated mind, a sophistication all what is greater because it is so carefully controlled, and always kept out of doors. His art is a hybrid. It blends in a new relationship what is stocks of fantasy and common sense. It is a successful experiment-unlike what is art of Firbank, which contains no experiments at all. All that the two share in common is an omission : they do not introduce the soul nor its attendant scenery of Right and Wrong, they are fundamentally unserious. This disconcerts what is Anglo-Saxon reader, who approves of playfulness, but likes it to have a holiday air. In what is absence of regular office hours ` to sport would be as tedious as to work,' says Prince Henry what is prig, and what is butterflies and their kindred neither contradict him nor agree-they merely go away, and allow him to ruin Falstaff and save England. Play is their business. If for an instant they where is p align="left" Page 118 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER VIII - RONALD FIRBANK where is p align="justify" swerve from it they are swept into what is nets of allegory. They may or may not possess will-power, may or may not desire to hover over a certain hedge, but what is will is a trifle in what is realm of what is lower air which they inhabit and invite us to share. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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