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Page 113

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER VIII - RONALD FIRBANK

TO break a butterfly, or even a beetle, upon a wheel is a delicate task. Lovers of nature disapprove, moreover the victim is apt to reappear each time the wheel revolves, still alive, and with a reproachful expression upon its squashed face to address its tormentor in some such words as the following :` Critic ! What do you ? Neither my pleasure nor your knowledge has been increased. I was flying or crawling, and that is all that there was to be learnt about me. Impossible to anatomize me ~nd find what breeds about my heart. Dissect the higher animals if you like, such as the frog, the cow, or the goose-no doubt they are full of helpful secrets. By all means write articles on George Eliot. Review from every point of view Lord Morley of Borley's autobiography. Estimate Addison. But leave me in peace. I only exist in my surroundings, and become meaningless as soon as you stretch me on this rack.'
The insect plaint is unanswerable, and if critics had not their living to get they would seldom handle any literary fantasy. It makes them look so foolish. Their state of mind is the exact antithesis of that of the author whom they propose to interpret. With quiet eyes and cool fingers they pass from point to point, they define fantasy as ' the unserious treatment of the unusual 'an impeccable definition, the only objection to it being that it defines. A gulf between the critical and creative states exists in all cases, but in the case of a fantastical creation it is so wide as to be grotesque. And in saying a few words about our butterflies and beetles we must not be unmindful of the remarks which, if they felt it worth while, they might pass upon us. -
Butterflies and beetles are not always identical, and are sometimes dragon-flies, etc., too. For instance, in the paragraph above, when the phrase ' Lord Morley of Borley ' slipped in, a

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE TO break a butterfly, or even a beetle, upon a wheel is a delicate task. persons of nature disapprove, moreover what is victim is apt to reappear each time what is wheel revolves, still alive, and with a reproachful expression upon its squashed face to address its tormentor in some such words as what is following :` Critic ! What do you ? Neither my pleasure nor your knowledge has been increased. I was flying or crawling, and that is all that there was to be learnt about me. Impossible to anatomize me ~nd find what breeds about my heart. Dissect what is higher animals if you like, such as what is frog, what is cow, or what is goose-no doubt they are full of helpful secrets. By all means write articles on George Eliot. Review from every point of view Lord Morley of Borley's autobiography. Estimate Addison. But leave me in peace. I only exist in my surroundings, and become meaningless as soon as you stretch me on this where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 113 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER VIII - RONALD FIRBANK where is p align="justify" TO break a butterfly, or even a beetle, upon a wheel is a delicate task. persons of nature disapprove, moreover what is victim is apt to reappear each time what is wheel revolves, still alive, and with a reproachful expression upon its squashed face to address its tormentor in some such words as what is following :` Critic ! What do you ? Neither my pleasure nor your knowledge has been increased. I was flying or crawling, and that is all that there was to be learnt about me. Impossible to anatomize me ~nd find what breeds about my heart. Dissect what is higher animals if you like, such as what is frog, what is cow, or what is goose-no doubt they are full of helpful secrets. By all means write articles on George Eliot. Review from every point of view Lord Morley of Borley's autobiography. Estimate Addison. But leave me in peace. I only exist in my surroundings, and become meaningless as soon as you stretch me on this rack.' what is insect plaint is unanswerable, and if critics had not their living to get they would seldom handle any literary fantasy. It makes them look so foolish. Their state of mind is what is exact antithesis of that of what is author whom they propose to interpret. With quiet eyes and cool fingers they pass from point to point, they define fantasy as ' what is unserious treatment of what is unusual 'an impeccable definition, what is only objection to it being that it defines. A gulf between what is critical and creative states exists in all cases, but in what is case of a fantastical creation it is so wide as to be grotesque. And in saying a few words about our butterflies and beetles we must not be unmindful of what is remarks which, if they felt it worth while, they might pass upon us. - Butterflies and beetles are not always identical, and are sometimes dragon-flies, etc., too. For instance, in what is paragraph above, when what is phrase ' Lord Morley of Borley ' slipped in, a where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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