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PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER VII - THE EARLY NOVELS OF VIRGINIA WOOLF

lit by windows placed at suitable intervals between the pictures. First come some portraits, then a window with a view say of Norfolk, then some more portraits and perhaps a still life, followed by a window with a view of Persia, then more portraits and perhaps a fancy piece, followed by a view of the universe. The pictures and the windows are infinite in number, so that every variety of experience seems assured, and yet there is one factor that never varies : namely the gallery itself ; the gallery is always the same, and the reader always has the feeling that he is pacing along it, under the conditions of time and space that regulate his daily life. Virginia Woolf would do away with the sense of pacing. The pictures and windows may remain if they can-indeed the portraits must remain-but she wants to destroy the gallery in which they are embedded and in its place build-build what ? Something more rhythmical. Jacob's Room suggests a spiral whirling down to a point, Mrs. Dalloway a cathedral.

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