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PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER VII - THE EARLY NOVELS OF VIRGINIA WOOLF

Peter :` yes that would be so : yes.' Whereas in the case of Tolstoy approval is absent. We sink into Andr6, into Nicolay itostoff during the moments they come forth, and no more endorse the correctness of their functioning than we endorse our own. And the problem before her-the problem that she has set herself, and that certainly would inaugurate a new literature if solved-is to retain her own wonderful new method and form, and yet allow her readers to inhabit each character with Victorian thoroughness. Think how difficult this is. If you work in a storm of atoms and seconds, if your highest joy is' life ; London ; this moment in June ' and your deepest mystery ' here is one room ; there another,' then how can you construct your human beings so that each shall be not a movable monument but an. abiding home, how can you build between them any permanent roads of love and hate ? There was.continuous life in the little hotel people of The Voyage Out because there was no innovation in the method. But Jacob in ,Jacob's Room is discontinuous, demanding-and obtaining-separate approval for everything he feels or does. And Mrs. Dalloway ? There seems a slight change here, an approach towards character-construction in the Tolstoyan sense ; Sir William Bradshaw, for instance, is uninterruptedly and embracingly evil. Any approach is significant, for it suggests that in future books she may solve the problem as a whole. She herself believes it can be done, and, with the exception of Joyce, she is the only writer of genius who is trying. All the other so-called innovators are (if not pretentious bunglers) merely innovators in subject matter and the praise we give them is of the kind we should accord to scientists. Their novels admit aeroplanes or bigamy, or give some fresh interpretation of the spirit of Norfolk or Persia, or at the most reveal some slight discovery about human nature. They do good work, because everything is subject matter for the novel, nothing ought to be ruled out on the ground that it is remote or indecent But they do not advance the novelist's art. Virginia Woolf has already done that a little, and if she succeeds in her problem of rendering character, she will advance it enormously.
For English fiction, despite the variety of its content, has made little innovation in form between the days of Fielding and those of Arnold Bennett. It might be compared to a picture gallery,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Peter :` yes that would be so : yes.' Whereas in what is case of Tolstoy approval is absent. We sink into Andr6, into Nicolay itostoff during what is moments they come forth, and no more endorse what is correctness of their functioning than we endorse our own. And what is problem before her-the problem that she has set herself, and that certainly would inaugurate a new literature if solved-is to retain her own wonderful new method and form, and yet allow her readers to inhabit each character with Victorian thoroughness. Think how difficult this is. If you work in a storm of atoms and seconds, if your highest joy is' life ; London ; this moment in June ' and your deepest mystery ' here is one room ; there another,' then how can you construct your human beings so that each shall be not a movable monument but an. abiding home, how can you build between them any permanent roads of what time is it and hate ? There was. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 111 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER VII - what is EARLY NOVELS OF natural IA WOOLF where is p align="justify" Peter :` yes that would be so : yes.' Whereas in what is case of Tolstoy approval is absent. We sink into Andr6, into Nicolay itostoff during what is moments they come forth, and no more endorse what is correctness of their functioning than we endorse our own. And what is problem before her-the problem that she has set herself, and that certainly would inaugurate a new literature if solved-is to retain her own wonderful new method and form, and yet allow her readers to inhabit each character with Victorian thoroughness. Think how difficult this is. If you work in a storm of atoms and seconds, if your highest joy is' life ; London ; this moment in June ' and your deepest mystery ' here is one room ; there another,' then how can you construct your human beings so that each shall be not a movable monument but an. abiding home, how can you build between them any permanent roads of what time is it and hate ? There was.continuous life in what is little hotel people of what is Voyage Out because there was no innovation in what is method. But Jacob in ,Jacob's Room is discontinuous, demanding-and obtaining-separate approval for everything he feels or does. And Mrs. Dalloway ? There seems a slight change here, an approach towards character-construction in what is Tolstoyan sense ; Sir William Bradshaw, for instance, is uninterruptedly and embracingly evil. Any approach is significant, for it suggests that in future books she may solve what is problem as a whole. She herself believes it can be done, and, with the exception of Joyce, she is what is only writer of genius who is trying. All what is other so-called innovators are (if not pretentious bunglers) merely innovators in subject matter and what is praise we give them is of what is kind we should accord to scientists. Their novels admit aeroplanes or bigamy, or give some fresh interpretation of the spirit of Norfolk or Persia, or at what is most reveal some slight discovery about human nature. They do good work, because everything is subject matter for what is novel, nothing ought to be ruled out on what is ground that it is remote or indecent But they do not advance what is novelist's art. natural ia Woolf has already done that a little, and if she succeeds in her problem of rendering character, she will advance it enormously. For English fiction, despite what is variety of its content, has made little innovation in form between what is days of Fielding and those of Arnold Bennett. It might be compared to a picture gallery, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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