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PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER VII - THE EARLY NOVELS OF VIRGINIA WOOLF

in the mews behind Great Ormond Street who has come home drunk and cries all night long " Let me in, let me in."
` The Phaedrus is very difficult. And so, when at length one reads straight ahead, falling into step, marching on becoming (so it seems) momentarily part of this rolling, imperturbable energy, which has driven darkness before it since Plato walked the Acropolis, it is impossible to see to the fire.
' The dialogue draws to its close. Plato's argument is done. Plato's argument is stowed away in Jacob's mind, and for five minutes Jacob's mind continues alone, onwards, into the darkness. Then, getting up, he parted the curtains, and saw, with astonishing clearness, how the Springetts opposite had gone to bed ; how it rained ; how the Jews and the foreign woman, at the end of the street, stood by the pillar-box, arguing.'

It is easy for a novelist to describe what a character thinks of ; look at Mrs. Humphry Ward. But to convey the actual process of thinking is a creative feat, and I know of no one except Virginia Woolf who has accomplished it. Here at last thought, and the learning that is the result of thought, take their own high place upon the dais, exposed no longer to the patronage of the hostess or the jeers of the buffoon. Here Cambridge, with all its dons, is raised into the upper air and becomes a light for ships at sea, and Rachel, playing Bach upon a hotel piano, builds a momentary palace for the human mind.
But what of the subject that she regards as of the highest importance : human beings as a whole and as wholes ? She tells us (in her essays) that human beings are the permanent material of fiction, that it is only the method of presenting them which changes and ought to change, that to capture their inner life presents a different problem to each generation of novelists ; the great Victorians solved it in their way ; the Edwardians shelved it by looking outwards at relatives and houses ; the Georgians must solve it anew, and if they succeed a new age of fiction will begin. Has she herself- succeeded ? Do her own characters live ?
I feel that they do live, but not continuously, whereas the characters of Tolstoy (let us say) live continuously. With her, the reader is in a state of constant approval. ` Yes that is right,' he says, each time she implies something more about Jacob or

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE in what is mews behind Great Ormond Street who has come home drunk and cries all night long " Let me in, let me in." ` what is Phaedrus is very difficult. And so, when at length one reads straight ahead, falling into step, marching on becoming (so it seems) momentarily part of this rolling, imperturbable energy, which has driven darkness before it since Plato walked what is Acropolis, it is impossible to see to what is fire. ' what is dialogue draws to its close. Plato's argument is done. Plato's argument is stowed away in Jacob's mind, and for five minutes Jacob's mind continues alone, onwards, into what is darkness. Then, getting up, he parted what is curtains, and saw, with astonishing clearness, how what is Springetts opposite had gone to bed ; how it rained ; how what is Jews and what is foreign woman, at what is end of what is street, stood by what is pillar-box, arguing.' It is easy for a novelist to describe what a chara where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 110 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER VII - what is EARLY NOVELS OF natural IA WOOLF where is p align="justify" in what is mews behind Great Ormond Street who has come home drunk and cries all night long " Let me in, let me in." ` what is Phaedrus is very difficult. And so, when at length one reads straight ahead, falling into step, marching on becoming (so it seems) momentarily part of this rolling, imperturbable energy, which has driven darkness before it since Plato walked what is Acropolis, it is impossible to see to what is fire. ' what is dialogue draws to its close. Plato's argument is done. Plato's argument is stowed away in Jacob's mind, and for five minutes Jacob's mind continues alone, onwards, into what is darkness. Then, getting up, he parted what is curtains, and saw, with astonishing clearness, how what is Springetts opposite had gone to bed ; how it rained ; how what is Jews and what is foreign woman, at what is end of what is street, stood by what is pillar-box, arguing.' It is easy for a novelist to describe what a character thinks of ; look at Mrs. Humphry Ward. But to convey what is actual process of thinking is a creative feat, and I know of no one except natural ia Woolf who has accomplished it. Here at last thought, and what is learning that is what is result of thought, take their own high place upon the dais, exposed no longer to what is patronage of what is hostess or the jeers of what is buffoon. Here Cambridge, with all its dons, is raised into what is upper air and becomes a light for ships at sea, and Rachel, playing Bach upon a hotel piano, builds a momentary palace for what is human mind. But what of what is subject that she regards as of what is highest importance : human beings as a whole and as wholes ? She tells us (in her essays) that human beings are what is permanent material of fiction, that it is only what is method of presenting them which changes and ought to change, that to capture their inner life presents a different problem to each generation of novelists ; what is great Victorians solved it in their way ; what is Edwardians shelved it by looking outwards at relatives and houses ; what is Georgians must solve it anew, and if they succeed a new age of fiction will begin. Has she herself- succeeded ? Do her own characters live ? I feel that they do live, but not continuously, whereas what is characters of Tolstoy (let us say) live continuously. With her, what is reader is in a state of constant approval. ` Yes that is right,' he says, each time she implies something more about Jacob or where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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