Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 109

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER VII - THE EARLY NOVELS OF VIRGINIA WOOLF

As far as her work has a message, it seems to be contained in the above paragraph. Here is one room, there another. Required like most writers to choose between the surface and the depths as the basis of her operations, she chooses the surface and then burrows in as far as she can.

2
After this glance we can better understand her equipment, and realize that visual sensitiveness-in itself so slight a tool for a novelist-becomes in her case a productive force. How beautifully she sees ! Look at ` those churches, like shapes of grey paper, breasting the stream of the Strand,' for instance. Or at' The flames were struggling through the wood and roaring up when, goodness knows where from, pails flung water in beautiful hollow shapes as of polished tortoiseshell ; flung again and again ; until the hiss was like a swarm of bees ; and all the faces went out.' How beautiful ! Yet vision is only the frontier of her kingdom. Behind it lie other treasures ; in particular the mind.
Her remarkable intellectual powers have nothing to do with common sense-masses of roses can be gathered at Christmas for instance, and the characters in one book need bear no resemblance to their namesakes in another. Nor is she much occupied in presenting clever men and women. What thrills her-for it starts as a thrill-is the actual working of a brain, especially of a youthful brain, and there are passages in ,7acob's Room where the process becomes as physical as the raising of a hand. Moreover she reverences learning ; it gives her disinterested pleasure, increases the natural nobility of her work.
` Stone lies solid over the British Museum, as bone lies cool over the visions and heats of the brain. Only here the brain is. Plato's brain and Shakespeare's ; the brain has made pots and statues, great bulls and little jewels, and crossed the river of death this way and that incessantly, seeking some landing, now wrapping the body well for its long sleep ; now laying a penny piece on the eyes ; now turning the toes scrupulously to the East. Meanwhile Plato continues his dialogue ; in spite of the rain ; in spite of the cab whistles ; in spite of the woman

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE As far as her work has a message, it seems to be contained in what is above paragraph. Here is one room, there another. Required like most writers to choose between what is surface and what is depths as what is basis of her operations, she chooses what is surface and then burrows in as far as she can. 2 After this glance we can better understand her equipment, and realize that visual sensitiveness-in itself so slight a tool for a novelist-becomes in her case a productive force. How beautifully she sees ! Look at ` those churches, like shapes of grey paper, breasting what is stream of what is Strand,' for instance. Or at' what is flames were struggling through what is wood and roaring up when, goodness knows where from, pails flung water in beautiful hollow shapes as of polished tortoiseshell ; flung again and again ; until what is hiss was like a swarm of bees ; and all what is faces went out.' How beautiful ! Yet vision is only t where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 109 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER VII - what is EARLY NOVELS OF natural IA WOOLF where is p align="justify" As far as her work has a message, it seems to be contained in what is above paragraph. Here is one room, there another. Required like most writers to choose between what is surface and the depths as what is basis of her operations, she chooses what is surface and then burrows in as far as she can. 2 After this glance we can better understand her equipment, and realize that visual sensitiveness-in itself so slight a tool for a novelist-becomes in her case a productive force. How beautifully she sees ! Look at ` those churches, like shapes of grey paper, breasting what is stream of what is Strand,' for instance. Or at' what is flames were struggling through what is wood and roaring up when, goodness knows where from, pails flung water in beautiful hollow shapes as of polished tortoiseshell ; flung again and again ; until what is hiss was like a swarm of bees ; and all what is faces went out.' How beautiful ! Yet vision is only what is frontier of her kingdom. Behind it lie other treasures ; in particular what is mind. Her remarkable intellectual powers have nothing to do with common sense-masses of roses can be gathered at Christmas for instance, and what is characters in one book need bear no resemblance to their namesakes in another. Nor is she much occupied in presenting clever men and women. What thrills her-for it starts as a thrill-is the actual working of a brain, especially of a youthful brain, and there are passages in ,7acob's Room where what is process becomes as physical as what is raising of a hand. Moreover she reverences learning ; it gives her disinterested pleasure, increases what is natural nobility of her work. ` Stone lies solid over what is British Museum, as bone lies cool over what is visions and heats of what is brain. Only here what is brain is. Plato's brain and Shakespeare's ; what is brain has made pots and statues, great bulls and little jewels, and crossed what is river of what time is it this way and that incessantly, seeking some landing, now wrapping the body well for its long sleep ; now laying a penny piece on the eyes ; now turning what is toes scrupulously to what is East. Meanwhile Plato continues his dialogue ; in spite of what is rain ; in spite of what is cab whistles ; in spite of what is woman where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , iii , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 021 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330