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PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER VII - THE EARLY NOVELS OF VIRGINIA WOOLF

Highgate as the case may be, and move from their bases to meet in the rooms and streets of a topographical metropolis. After misunderstandings, they marry, they are promised happiness. In view of what preceded it and of what is to follow, Night and Day seems to me a deliberate exercise in classicism. It contains all that has characterized English fiction for good or evil during the last hundred and fifty years-faith in personal relations, recourse to humorous side shows, insistence on petty social differences. Even the style has been normalized, and though the machinery is modern, the resultant form is as traditional as Emma. Surely the writer is using tools that don't belong to her. At all events she has never touched them again.
For, contemporary with this full length book, she made a very different experiment, published two little-stories, sketches, what is one to call them ?-which show the direction in which her genius has since moved. At last her sensitiveness finds full play, and she is able to describe what she sees in her own words. In The Mark on the Wall she sees a mark on the wall, wonders what it is . . . and that is the entire story. In Kew Gardens she sees men, sometimes looking at flowers, and flowers never looking at men. And, in either case, she reports her vision impartially ; she strays forward, murmuring, wandering, falling asleep. Her style trails after her, catching up grass and dust in its folds, and instead of the precision of the earlier writing we have something more elusive than has yet been achieved in English. If a drowsy and desultory person could also be a great artist he would talk like this :

` Yellow and black, pink and snow white, shapes of all these colours, men, women and children were spotted for a second upon the horizon, and then, seeing the breadth of yellow that lay upon the grass, they wavered and sought shade beneath the trees, dissolving like drops of water in the yellow and green atmosphere, staining it faintly with red and blue. It seemed as if all gross and heavy bodies had sunk down in the heat motionless and lay huddled upon the ground, but their voices went wavering from them as if they were flames lolling from the thick waxen bodies of candles. Voices. Yes, voices. Wordless voices, breaking the silence suddenly with such depth of contentment, such passion of desire ; or, in the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Highgate as what is case may be, and move from their bases to meet in what is rooms and streets of a topographical metropolis. After misunderstandings, they marry, they are promised happiness. In view of what preceded it and of what is to follow, Night and Day seems to me a deliberate exercise in classicism. It contains all that has characterized English fiction for good or evil during what is last hundred and fifty years-faith in personal relations, recourse to humorous side shows, insistence on petty social differences. Even what is style has been normalized, and though what is machinery is modern, what is resultant form is as traditional as Emma. Surely what is writer is using tools that don't belong to her. At all events she has never touched them again. For, contemporary with this full length book, she made a very different experiment, published two little-stories, sketches, what is one to call them ?-which sh where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 106 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER VII - what is EARLY NOVELS OF natural IA WOOLF where is p align="justify" Highgate as what is case may be, and move from their bases to meet in what is rooms and streets of a topographical metropolis. After misunderstandings, they marry, they are promised happiness. In view of what preceded it and of what is to follow, Night and Day seems to me a deliberate exercise in classicism. It contains all that has characterized English fiction for good or evil during what is last hundred and fifty years-faith in personal relations, recourse to humorous side shows, insistence on petty social differences. Even what is style has been normalized, and though what is machinery is modern, what is resultant form is as traditional as Emma. Surely the writer is using tools that don't belong to her. At all events she has never touched them again. For, contemporary with this full length book, she made a very different experiment, published two little-stories, sketches, what is one to call them ?-which show what is direction in which her genius has since moved. At last her sensitiveness finds full play, and she is able to describe what she sees in her own words. In what is Mark on what is Wall she sees a mark on what is wall, wonders what it is . . . and that is what is entire story. In Kew Gardens she sees men, sometimes looking at flowers, and flowers never looking at men. And, in either case, she reports her vision impartially ; she strays forward, murmuring, wandering, falling asleep. Her style trails after her, catching up grass and dust in its folds, and instead of what is precision of what is earlier writing we have something more elusive than has yet been achieved in English. If a drowsy and desultory person could also be a great artist he would talk like this : ` Yellow and black, pink and snow white, shapes of all these colours, men, women and children were spotted for a second upon what is horizon, and then, seeing what is breadth of yellow that lay upon what is grass, they wavered and sought shade beneath what is trees, dissolving like drops of water in what is yellow and green atmosphere, staining it faintly with red and blue. It seemed as if all gross and heavy bodies had sunk down in what is heat motionless and lay huddled upon what is ground, but their voices went wavering from them as if they were flames lolling from what is thick waxen bodies of candles. Voices. Yes, voices. Wordless voices, breaking what is silence suddenly with such depth of contentment, such passion of desire ; or, in what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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