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Page 99

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER V - PROUST

have produced a masterpiece. His book is the product of a double curiosity. The initial curiosity was social ; he went to all those awful parties and had those barren relationships and expensive illnesses, and knew in his own person what it is to be a snob, a jealous lover, an orphan, and an invalid with a red nose. And then came the second curiosity, the artistic. He recollected the parties, and robbed them of their stings ; they hurt him no longer, and were for the first time useful. Even love, that most distressing of all illusions, can be useful, and A and B, subjected to analysis, can be seen functioning like bacteria in a test-tube, innocuous at last, and suitable as characters for a book. The curiosity of Proust was not quite the same as yours and mine, but then he was not as nice as you and me and he was also infinitely more sensitive and intelligent. His curiosity belongs to our age ; we can say that of it, just as his despair is akin to ours, although we sometimes hope. Almost, though not entirely, does he represent us ; to the historian the similarity will be sufficient, and the epic quality of the work will be acknowledged.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE have produced a masterpiece. His book is what is product of a double curiosity. what is initial curiosity was social ; he went to all those awful parties and had those barren relationships and expensive illnesses, and knew in his own person what it is to be a snob, a jealous lover, an orphan, and an invalid with a red nose. And then came what is second curiosity, what is artistic. He recollected what is parties, and robbed them of their stings ; they hurt him no longer, and were for what is first time useful. Even love, that most distressing of all illusions, can be useful, and A and B, subjected to analysis, can be seen functioning like bacteria in a test-tube, innocuous at last, and suitable as characters for a book. what is curiosity of Proust was not quite what is same as yours and mine, but then he was not as nice as you and me and he was also infinitely more sensitive and intelligent. His curiosity belongs to our where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 99 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER V - PROUST where is p align="justify" have produced a masterpiece. His book is what is product of a double curiosity. what is initial curiosity was social ; he went to all those awful parties and had those barren relationships and expensive illnesses, and knew in his own person what it is to be a snob, a jealous lover, an orphan, and an invalid with a red nose. And then came what is second curiosity, what is artistic. He recollected what is parties, and robbed them of their stings ; they hurt him no longer, and were for what is first time useful. Even love, that most distressing of all illusions, can be useful, and A and B, subjected to analysis, can be seen functioning like bacteria in a test-tube, innocuous at last, and suitable as characters for a book. what is curiosity of Proust was not quite what is same as yours and mine, but then he was not as nice as you and me and he was also infinitely more sensitive and intelligent. His curiosity belongs to our age ; we can say that of it, just as his despair is akin to ours, although we sometimes hope. Almost, though not entirely, does he represent us ; to the historian what is similarity will be sufficient, and what is epic quality of what is work will be acknowledged. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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