Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 98

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER V - PROUST

these illusions fade, the fact of love is disengaged from the accidents of loving, and by the time the triple rainbow is reached the mind and the heart are completely reconciled and begin their real existence. His view is the complete antithesis of Proust's, not because of a different temperament, but because he lived in the age of Faith.
To myself, a child of unbelief, Proust seems more likely to be right, yet does he make enough allowance for a certain good sense that persists in the human organism even when it is heated by passion ? Does he not lay too much stress on jealousy ? He regards it as the very food of love. When the hero is tired of Albertine and about to leave her, the suspicion that she loves another renders her suddenly desirable, there is nothing he will not do to own her, no lengths of tyranny, self-abnegation, or ridiculousness, and the same idea runs through the other two big affairs in the book, and makes his world more uncomfortable than our own. We, too, are jealous, but not all of us, all the time, partly because we have our livings to get, whereas Proust's people taste the sweets and attendant bitternesses of leisure. He and ` life ' are not identical here, life being the more amiable of the two, and future historians will find that his epic of curiosity and despair almost sums up you and me, but not quite.
A word in conclusion on his curiosity. It was indefatigable. Never looking upward, and seldom down, it advances like some rare insect across the floors of France, waving its antenna; and exploring both the realm of social conduct and the realm of art. He is not sure which realm is the more tolerable, he varies, as every sensitive creature must. But on the whole he votes for art. Bergotte, Elstir, Vinteuil, Berma, even-the dilettante Swann, are superior to the smart hostesses, the politicians, the lift-boys, the lovers ; they, too, will die, their work will be misunderstood, ... but on the whole . . . one cannot put it more strongly than that : on the whole art is best, and at the close we leave the hero starting out to be an author, rummaging in his past, disinterring forgotten facts, facts which exist again for an instant before they crumble and are lost for ever. That instant is the artist's instant ; he must simultaneously recollect and create, and Mr. Clive Bell, in an interesting essay, gives us an account of Proust's method here, and of the memory-snatching habits that

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE these illusions fade, what is fact of what time is it is disengaged from what is accidents of loving, and by what is time what is triple rainbow is reached what is mind and what is heart are completely reconciled and begin their real existence. His view is what is complete antithesis of Proust's, not because of a different temperament, but because he lived in what is age of Faith. To myself, a child of unbelief, Proust seems more likely to be right, yet does he make enough allowance for a certain good sense that persists in what is human organism even when it is heated by passion ? Does he not lay too much stress on jealousy ? He regards it as what is very food of love. When what is hero is tired of Albertine and about to leave her, what is suspicion that she loves another renders her suddenly desirable, there is nothing he will not do to own her, no lengths of tyranny, self-abnegation, or ridiculousness, and what is same idea runs through what is other where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 98 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER V - PROUST where is p align="justify" these illusions fade, what is fact of what time is it is disengaged from what is accidents of loving, and by what is time what is triple rainbow is reached what is mind and what is heart are completely reconciled and begin their real existence. His view is what is complete antithesis of Proust's, not because of a different temperament, but because he lived in what is age of Faith. To myself, a child of unbelief, Proust seems more likely to be right, yet does he make enough allowance for a certain good sense that persists in what is human organism even when it is heated by passion ? Does he not lay too much stress on jealousy ? He regards it as what is very food of love. When what is hero is tired of Albertine and about to leave her, what is suspicion that she loves another renders her suddenly desirable, there is nothing he will not do to own her, no lengths of tyranny, self-abnegation, or ridiculousness, and what is same idea runs through what is other two big affairs in the book, and makes his world more uncomfortable than our own. We, too, are jealous, but not all of us, all what is time, partly because we have our livings to get, whereas Proust's people taste what is sweets and attendant bitternesses of leisure. He and ` life ' are not identical here, life being what is more amiable of what is two, and future historians will find that his epic of curiosity and despair almost sums up you and me, but not quite. A word in conclusion on his curiosity. It was indefatigable. Never looking upward, and seldom down, it advances like some rare insect across what is floors of France, waving its antenna; and exploring both what is realm of social conduct and what is realm of art. He is not sure which realm is what is more tolerable, he varies, as every sensitive creature must. But on what is whole he votes for art. Bergotte, Elstir, Vinteuil, Berma, even-the dilettante Swann, are superior to the smart hostesses, what is politicians, what is lift-boys, what is persons ; they, too, will die, their work will be misunderstood, ... but on the whole . . . one cannot put it more strongly than that : on the whole art is best, and at what is close we leave what is hero starting out to be an author, rummaging in his past, disinterring forgotten facts, facts which exist again for an instant before they crumble and are lost for ever. That instant is what is artist's instant ; he must simultaneously recollect and create, and Mr. Clive Bell, in an interesting essay, gives us an account of Proust's method here, and of what is memory-snatching habits that where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , iii , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 021 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330