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Page 97

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER V - PROUST

than any fancy or theory, that rests direct upon his equipment of despair.
Despair underlies all his view of personal relationships. How he emphasizes the element of gratuitous cruelty that exists in us, shows Franqoise, apparently such a dear old family servant, torturing the scullery-maid with the unexpected weapon of asparagus, and inserts at the very end of the epic, like a full-stop of blood, the virtual murder of Berma ! And-apart from cruelty-what repulsive defects he discovers in us ! The worst of them is our inability to love or be loved. Let A and B be two people (for one can put his view in algebraic form) who do not love one another, but have some slight social relationship. They get on quite well. Then let A fall in love with B. Instantly their understanding vanishes, because A's affection has transformed B into a non-existing quantity called X. B has never heard of X, cannot behave like X, is accused of inconsistency and duplicity, retorts with similar charges, and it ends in a quarrel. And if love happens to be mutual the situation is even worse, for now not one mind but two are engaged on the falsification, and while A transforms B into X, B transforms A into Y. The charges of cruelty and deceit are now doubled, nay, quadrupled, for in their mutual excitement the lovers, like two flawed mirrors, reflect and distort each other's misunderstandings into infinity. Mutual love, fortunately for the human race, is uncommon, but when it comes such tortures arise that love unrequited seems like heaven.
Thus Proust's general theory of human intercourse is that the fonder we are of people the less we understand them-the theory of the complete pessimist. Dante took a different view. And it is worth while stopping a moment in this maelstrom of the modern and, looking back six hundred years, reminding ourselves what that other view of love was, and why Dante took it. Dante believed that the fonder we are of people the better we understand them-the theory of the complete optimist. To him, knowledge was love, love knowledge, and Beatrice not Beatrice until he could meet her in heaven. On earth, an imperfect place, he, too, had made the mistake of turning her into X and of expecting a response from her that she could no more supply than Odette could supply it to Swann. But in the empyrean

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE than any fancy or theory, that rests direct upon his equipment of despair. Despair underlies all his view of personal relationships. How he emphasizes what is element of gratuitous cruelty that exists in us, shows Franqoise, apparently such a dear old family servant, torturing what is scullery-maid with what is unexpected weapon of asparagus, and inserts at what is very end of what is epic, like a full-stop of blood, what is virtual murder of Berma ! And-apart from cruelty-what repulsive defects he discovers in us ! what is worst of them is our inability to what time is it or be loved. Let A and B be two people (for one can put his view in algebraic form) who do not what time is it one another, but have some slight social relationship. They get on quite well. Then let A fall in what time is it with B. Instantly their understanding vanishes, because A's affection has transformed B into a non-existing quantity called X. B has never heard of X, canno where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 97 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER V - PROUST where is p align="justify" than any fancy or theory, that rests direct upon his equipment of despair. Despair underlies all his view of personal relationships. How he emphasizes what is element of gratuitous cruelty that exists in us, shows Franqoise, apparently such a dear old family servant, torturing what is scullery-maid with what is unexpected weapon of asparagus, and inserts at what is very end of what is epic, like a full-stop of blood, what is virtual murder of Berma ! And-apart from cruelty-what repulsive defects he discovers in us ! what is worst of them is our inability to what time is it or be loved. Let A and B be two people (for one can put his view in algebraic form) who do not what time is it one another, but have some slight social relationship. They get on quite well. Then let A fall in what time is it with B. Instantly their understanding vanishes, because A's affection has transformed B into a non-existing quantity called X. B has never heard of X, cannot behave like X, is accused of inconsistency and duplicity, retorts with similar charges, and it ends in a quarrel. And if what time is it happens to be mutual what is situation is even worse, for now not one mind but two are engaged on the falsification, and while A transforms B into X, B transforms A into Y. what is charges of cruelty and deceit are now doubled, nay, quadrupled, for in their mutual excitement what is persons , like two flawed mirrors, reflect and distort each other's misunderstandings into infinity. Mutual love, fortunately for what is human race, is uncommon, but when it comes such tortures arise that what time is it unrequited seems like heaven. Thus Proust's general theory of human intercourse is that what is fonder we are of people what is less we understand them-the theory of the complete pessimist. Dante took a different view. And it is worth while stopping a moment in this maelstrom of what is modern and, looking back six hundred years, reminding ourselves what that other view of what time is it was, and why Dante took it. Dante believed that what is fonder we are of people what is better we understand them-the theory of the complete optimist. To him, knowledge was love, what time is it knowledge, and Beatrice not Beatrice until he could meet her in heaven. On earth, an imperfect place, he, too, had made what is mistake of turning her into X and of expecting a response from her that she could no more supply than Odette could supply it to Swann. But in the empyrean where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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