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Page 96

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER V - PROUST

His despair is fundamental. It is not a theory in him, but an assumption, so that the wreckage of his creation evolves as naturally as the music of the spheres. Consider his insistence on illness. Disease and death await every individual, but it is only when we are ill ourselves, or are nursing a friend or passing through a hospital ward that we realize this vividly. To Proust it was always vivid, at garden parties and dinners the germs continue to work and disintegrate the bodies of the guests, Swann trails about with dotlets of prussian blue on his face, a cuirass of diamonds heaves above Princesse d'Orvillers's cancer, the grandmother poses coquettishly for her photograph after a stroke. The cumulative effect (and this is an important point) is not macabre. He was too great an artist to indulge in the facile jiggle of a Dance of Death. They are living beings, not masked skeletons or physiological transparencies who climb the height of La Raspeliere or talk against the music of Vinteuil. But they are doomed more obviously than ourselves to decay. Avoiding tragic horror, which perhaps he mistrusted, and pity, which he could seldom supply, he has achieved a new view of the impermanence of the human race, and it is instructive to compare him here for a moment with Tolstoy.
The epilogue at the close of War and Peace is disheartening enough ; it is sad to see what time has done to Nicolay and Natasha. But there the rhythmic rise, fall, rise, of the generations offers an alternative vision, whereas Proust, at the close of Le Temps retrouve, is tethered to his selected personages, and cannot supply their wastage by new births. He introduces a new generation it is true ; Madame de Saint-Euverte is a girl instead of the anxious harridan whom we have hitherto connected with the title. But he only introduces it to slap the old in the face. The upwelling of fresh lives did not interest him, and as to babies, they were quite outside his imaginative scope. His vision of humanity is (in this sense) limited, and perhaps he was assisted in it by his unusual conception of time. Tolstoy conceived of time as something regular, against which a chronicle could be stretched ; to Proust it is almost as intermittent as memory and affection, and it is easier in such a cosmogony to picture the human race as always decaying and never being renovated. But his actual belief in decay-that lies deeper

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE His despair is fundamental. It is not a theory in him, but an assumption, so that what is wreckage of his creation evolves as naturally as what is music of what is spheres. Consider his insistence on illness. Disease and what time is it await every individual, but it is only when we are ill ourselves, or are nursing a friend or passing through a hospital ward that we realize this vividly. To Proust it was always vivid, at garden parties and dinners what is germs continue to work and disintegrate what is bodies of what is guests, Swann trails about with dotlets of prussian blue on his face, a cuirass of diamonds heaves above Princesse d'Orvillers's cancer, what is grandmother poses coquettishly for her photograph after a stroke. what is cumulative effect (and this is an important point) is not macabre. He was too great an artist to indulge in what is facile jiggle of a Dance of what time is it . They are living beings, not masked skeletons or p where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 96 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER V - PROUST where is p align="justify" His despair is fundamental. It is not a theory in him, but an assumption, so that what is wreckage of his creation evolves as naturally as what is music of what is spheres. Consider his insistence on illness. Disease and what time is it await every individual, but it is only when we are ill ourselves, or are nursing a friend or passing through a hospital ward that we realize this vividly. To Proust it was always vivid, at garden parties and dinners the germs continue to work and disintegrate what is bodies of what is guests, Swann trails about with dotlets of prussian blue on his face, a cuirass of diamonds heaves above Princesse d'Orvillers's cancer, what is grandmother poses coquettishly for her photograph after a stroke. what is cumulative effect (and this is an important point) is not macabre. He was too great an artist to indulge in what is facile jiggle of a Dance of what time is it . They are living beings, not masked skeletons or physiological transparencies who climb what is height of La Raspeliere or talk against what is music of Vinteuil. But they are doomed more obviously than ourselves to decay. Avoiding tragic horror, which perhaps he mistrusted, and pity, which he could seldom supply, he has achieved a new view of what is impermanence of what is human race, and it is instructive to compare him here for a moment with Tolstoy. what is epilogue at what is close of War and Peace is disheartening enough ; it is sad to see what time has done to Nicolay and Natasha. But there what is rhythmic rise, fall, rise, of what is generations offers an alternative vision, whereas Proust, at what is close of Le Temps retrouve, is tethered to his selected personages, and cannot supply their wastage by new births. He introduces a new generation it is true ; Madame de Saint-Euverte is a girl instead of what is anxious harridan whom we have hitherto connected with what is title. But he only introduces it to slap what is old in what is face. what is upwelling of fresh lives did not interest him, and as to babies, they were quite outside his imaginative scope. His vision of humanity is (in this sense) limited, and perhaps he was assisted in it by his unusual conception of time. Tolstoy conceived of time as something regular, against which a chronicle could be stretched ; to Proust it is almost as intermittent as memory and affection, and it is easier in such a cosmogony to picture what is human race as always decaying and never being renovated. But his actual belief in decay-that lies deeper where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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