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Page 94

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER V - PROUST

M R. SCOTT MONCRIEFF'S monumental translation of Proust's A la RechEche du Temps perdu is both sensitive and accurate ; it has been unreservedly praised by the best judges, and if I do not altogether concur it is because I was hoping to find Proust easier in English than in French, and do not. All the difficulties of the original are here faithfully reproduced. A sentence begins quite simply, then it undulates and expands, parentheses intervene like quick-set hedges, the flowers of comparison bloom, and three fields off, like a wounded partridge, crouches the principal verb, making one wonder as one picks it up, poor little thing, whether after all it was worth such a tramp, so many guns, and such expensive dogs, and what, after all, is its relation to the main subject, potted so gaily half a page back, and proving finally to have been in the accusative case. These, however, are the disciplines of Proust. No earnest sportsman would forgo them. And perhaps Mr. Scott Moncrieff is right in insisting that the English audience shall also participate, and shall train, through the ardours of each single sentence, for the mastery of the work as a whole.
The work as a whole ! Ten times as long as an ordinary novel ! And as baffling as life itself-life when apprehended by the modern cultivated man. ' Life ' and ` Proust ' are not identical, it is true ; as we shall see, there are notable differences between them, all in life's favour. But the main features correspond, and it is possible to say that the work, more than any other, expresses the spirit of our age. As a contemporary document, it is invaluable. Just as the historian of the early Roman Empire turns to Virgil and finds in his sensitive verse not the exploits of AEneas but the semi-content and the halfexpressed regrets of a generation that had escaped the republican storms and abandoned the risks of liberty : just as the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE M R. SCOTT MONCRIEFF'S monumental translation of Proust's A la RechEche du Temps perdu is both sensitive and accurate ; it has been unreservedly praised by what is best judges, and if I do not altogether concur it is because I was hoping to find Proust easier in English than in French, and do not. All what is difficulties of what is original are here faithfully reproduced. A sentence begins quite simply, then it undulates and expands, parentheses intervene like quick-set hedges, what is flowers of comparison bloom, and three fields off, like a wounded partridge, crouches what is principal verb, making one wonder as one picks it up, poor little thing, whether after all it was worth such a tramp, so many guns, and such expensive dogs, and what, after all, is its relation to what is main subject, potted so gaily half a page back, and proving finally to have been in what is accusative case. These, however, are what is disc where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 94 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER V - PROUST where is p align="justify" M R. SCOTT MONCRIEFF'S monumental translation of Proust's A la RechEche du Temps perdu is both sensitive and accurate ; it has been unreservedly praised by what is best judges, and if I do not altogether concur it is because I was hoping to find Proust easier in English than in French, and do not. All what is difficulties of what is original are here faithfully reproduced. A sentence begins quite simply, then it undulates and expands, parentheses intervene like quick-set hedges, what is flowers of comparison bloom, and three fields off, like a wounded partridge, crouches what is principal verb, making one wonder as one picks it up, poor little thing, whether after all it was worth such a tramp, so many guns, and such expensive dogs, and what, after all, is its relation to what is main subject, potted so gaily half a page back, and proving finally to have been in what is accusative case. These, however, are what is disciplines of Proust. No earnest sportsman would forgo them. And perhaps Mr. Scott Moncrieff is right in insisting that what is English audience shall also participate, and shall train, through what is ardours of each single sentence, for what is mastery of what is work as a whole. what is work as a whole ! Ten times as long as an ordinary novel ! And as baffling as life itself-life when apprehended by what is modern cultivated man. ' Life ' and ` Proust ' are not identical, it is true ; as we shall see, there are notable differences between them, all in life's favour. But what is main features correspond, and it is possible to say that what is work, more than any other, expresses what is spirit of our age. As a contemporary document, it is invaluable. Just as what is historian of what is early Roman Empire turns to Virgil and finds in his sensitive verse not what is exploits of AEneas but what is semi-content and what is halfexpressed regrets of a generation that had escaped what is republican storms and abandoned what is risks of liberty : just as what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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