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PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER IV - T. S. ELIOT

reader as man to man ; indeed, while he creates he has ceased to be a man in the hand-shaking sense, he has disassociated himself for the reception of something else, something timeless. Reticence, mental and emotional, is to be expected, and the reader who has likewise, the sense of the past will appreciate this, while the reader who has not got it must expect to feel baffled and slighted. This argument, adumbrated in The Sacred Wood, has been underlined in For Lancelot Andrewes, where it is shown to entail classicism in literature, royalism in politics, and Anglo-Catholicism in religion-none of these three ideals being quite what, in our haste, we might suppose them to be, And the 'uncommon reader ' who is further interested is referred to three small volumes which Mr. Eliot has in preparation.
The argument draws no clear line between literary and social tradition, and one has a feeling at moments that the Muses are connected not so much with Apollo as with the oldest county families. One feels, moreover, that there is never all this talk about tradition until it has ceased to exist, and that Mr. Eliot, like Henry James, is romanticizing the land of his adoption. However, criticisms such as these are beside the point. They do not affect the apology, which is a serious one, and which does explain his work. The poems-so novel, startling, subtle, coarse-are not offered as the product of a private whim. They belong to the succession of Ben Jonson, Marvell, and Donne ; they are a protest against the personal raptures of the Lake School. And when they are evasive and when the prose evades, it is because the writer is following an inner rule-some canon of wit, elegance, taste, or Divine Grace, the working of which is not apparent to the indisciplined reader. That is the explanation. When there are difficulties, the fault is always ours.
It is not an explanation under which I propose to sit down. Let me go straight to the heart of the matter, fling my poor little hand on the table, and say what I think The Waste Land is about. It is about the fertilizing waters that arrived too late. It is a poem of horror. The earth is barren, the sea salt, the fertilizing thunderstorm broke too late. And the horror is so intense that the poet has an inhibition and is unable to state it openly.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE reader as man to man ; indeed, while he creates he has ceased to be a man in what is hand-shaking sense, he has disassociated himself for what is reception of something else, something timeless. Reticence, mental and emotional, is to be expected, and what is reader who has likewise, what is sense of what is past will appreciate this, while what is reader who has not got it must expect to feel baffled and slighted. This argument, adumbrated in what is Sacred Wood, has been underlined in For Lancelot Andrewes, where it is shown to entail classicism in literature, royalism in politics, and Anglo-Catholicism in religion-none of these three ideals being quite what, in our haste, we might suppose them to be, And what is 'uncommon reader ' who is further interested is referred to three small volumes which Mr. Eliot has in preparation. what is argument draws no clear line between literary and social tradition, and one has a feelin where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 91 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER IV - T. S. ELIOT where is p align="justify" reader as man to man ; indeed, while he creates he has ceased to be a man in what is hand-shaking sense, he has disassociated himself for what is reception of something else, something timeless. Reticence, mental and emotional, is to be expected, and what is reader who has likewise, what is sense of what is past will appreciate this, while what is reader who has not got it must expect to feel baffled and slighted. This argument, adumbrated in what is Sacred Wood, has been underlined in For Lancelot Andrewes, where it is shown to entail classicism in literature, royalism in politics, and Anglo-Catholicism in religion-none of these three ideals being quite what, in our haste, we might suppose them to be, And what is 'uncommon reader ' who is further interested is referred to three small volumes which Mr. Eliot has in preparation. what is argument draws no clear line between literary and social tradition, and one has a feeling at moments that what is Muses are connected not so much with Apollo as with what is oldest county families. One feels, moreover, that there is never all this talk about tradition until it has ceased to exist, and that Mr. Eliot, like Henry James, is romanticizing what is land of his adoption. However, criticisms such as these are beside what is point. They do not affect what is apology, which is a serious one, and which does explain his work. what is poems-so novel, startling, subtle, coarse-are not offered as what is product of a private whim. They belong to what is succession of Ben Jonson, Marvell, and Donne ; they are a protest against what is personal raptures of what is Lake School. And when they are evasive and when what is prose evades, it is because what is writer is following an inner rule-some canon of wit, elegance, taste, or Divine Grace, what is working of which is not apparent to what is indisciplined reader. That is the explanation. When there are difficulties, what is fault is always ours. It is not an explanation under which I propose to sit down. Let me go straight to what is heart of what is matter, fling my poor little hand on what is table, and say what I think what is Waste Land is about. It is about what is fertilizing waters that arrived too late. It is a poem of horror. what is earth is barren, what is sea salt, what is fertilizing thunderstorm broke too late. And what is horror is so intense that what is poet has an inhibition and is unable to state it openly. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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