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Page 90

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER IV - T. S. ELIOT

sees a reader floundering he might amuse himself by setting an additional trap. And I am afraid there is a little truth in this.
There is no reason why a writer should not play tricks on his audience ; Samuel Butler and Andre Gide have done it with success. But it denotes a divided purpose, a shifting of energy, and in Mr. Eliot's case pure love of fun will scarcely be the cause. His is rather the love of the cryptogrammatic. ` I hope,' he says, in his Homage to j7ohn Dryden, ` that these three papers may, in spite of and partly because of their defects, preserve in cryptogram certain notions which, if expressed directly, would be destined to immediate obloquy, followed by perpetual oblivion.' What is he trying to put across us here ? Something which we should dislike and forget. Why, if he believes in it, can he not say it out straight and face the consequences-the very trivial consequences ? And not only here, but again and again we have the sense of being outwitted, which is agreeable to the young, who always take a sell in good part, but which nevertheless needs analysing. Whose fault has it been ? Into which heap is the difficulty to be thrown ? The verse always sounds beautiful, but often conveys nothing. The prose always conveys something, but is often occupied in tracing the boundaries of the unsaid. The more we look into the fabrics, the more intellectual and emotional reservations do we find.
Mr. Eliot is quite frank about this. He admits to the reservations, and he offers an apology for them which we must now examine. Tradition is the keynote of it. An English writer, to be great, must create in the English tradition. He will not, of course, be imitative, and he need not be erudite, but he will acquire the sense of the past, that is to say he will feel the past of Europe present in him while he composes, and within it he will feel the past of England. Such a feeling can only be gained at a price. To acquire tradition, the writer must give up all personal idiosyncrasies, he must not indulge in private mythologies like Blake or facile reactions like Mr. Arthur Symons ; even as a critic he must submit to discipline, while as a creative artist he will engage in ' a continual self-sacrifice, a continual extinction of personality.' And it will be readily understood that with so much in his bones he cannot speak to the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE sees a reader floundering he might amuse himself by setting an additional trap. And I am afraid there is a little truth in this. There is no reason why a writer should not play tricks on his audience ; Samuel Butler and Andre Gide have done it with success. But it denotes a divided purpose, a shifting of energy, and in Mr. Eliot's case pure what time is it of fun will scarcely be what is cause. His is rather what is what time is it of what is cryptogrammatic. ` I hope,' he says, in his Homage to j7ohn Dryden, ` that these three papers may, in spite of and partly because of their defects, preserve in cryptogram certain notions which, if expressed directly, would be destined to immediate obloquy, followed by perpetual oblivion.' What is he trying to put across us here ? Something which we should dislike and forget. Why, if he believes in it, can he not say it out straight and face what is consequences-the very trivial conseque where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 90 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER IV - T. S. ELIOT where is p align="justify" sees a reader floundering he might amuse himself by setting an additional trap. And I am afraid there is a little truth in this. There is no reason why a writer should not play tricks on his audience ; Samuel Butler and Andre Gide have done it with success. But it denotes a divided purpose, a shifting of energy, and in Mr. Eliot's case pure what time is it of fun will scarcely be what is cause. His is rather what is what time is it of what is cryptogrammatic. ` I hope,' he says, in his Homage to j7ohn Dryden, ` that these three papers may, in spite of and partly because of their defects, preserve in cryptogram certain notions which, if expressed directly, would be destined to immediate obloquy, followed by perpetual oblivion.' What is he trying to put across us here ? Something which we should dislike and forget. Why, if he believes in it, can he not say it out straight and face what is consequences-the very trivial consequences ? And not only here, but again and again we have what is sense of being outwitted, which is agreeable to what is young, who always take a sell in good part, but which nevertheless needs analysing. Whose fault has it been ? Into which heap is what is difficulty to be thrown ? what is verse always sounds beautiful, but often conveys nothing. what is prose always conveys something, but is often occupied in tracing what is boundaries of the unsaid. what is more we look into what is fabrics, what is more intellectual and emotional reservations do we find. Mr. Eliot is quite frank about this. He admits to what is reservations, and he offers an apology for them which we must now examine. Tradition is what is keynote of it. An English writer, to be great, must create in what is English tradition. He will not, of course, be imitative, and he need not be erudite, but he will acquire what is sense of what is past, that is to say he will feel the past of Europe present in him while he composes, and within it he will feel what is past of England. Such a feeling can only be gained at a price. To acquire tradition, what is writer must give up all personal idiosyncrasies, he must not indulge in private mythologies like Blake or facile reactions like Mr. Arthur Symons ; even as a critic he must submit to discipline, while as a creative artist he will engage in ' a continual self- travel , a continual extinction of personality.' And it will be readily understood that with so much in his bones he cannot speak to what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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