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Page 89

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER IV - T. S. ELIOT

as he would open a cigarette case, cannot expect to get very far. There is abundance of beauty and even of amusement awaiting us, there is all the treasure of a richly-stored and active mind, but we are expected to do our share, and if (to take a concrete test) we cannot do it over the little essay in The Sacred Wood entitled Hamlet and his Problems, it means that we are not up to his standard, and must keep to ready-made stuff. I instance the Hamlet essay because it is both sensitive and lucid (two of Mr. Eliot's great merits), because it handles with amazing skill problems both of historical criticism and of psychology, and because it never attempts to mystify. If we find difficulties here, the fault is ours.
But is the fault always ours ? Are there not cases where we turn away because there was no way in ? And if our check is due to the writer, why is it that, having set out to address us, he should change his intention, and mislead ?
It is natural, at this point of our inquiry, to ask help of the young. For Mr. Eliot's work, particularly The Waste Land, has made a profound impression on them, and given them precisely the food they needed. And by ` the young ' I mean those men and women between the ages of eighteen and thirty whose opinions one most respects, and whose reactions one most admires. He is the most important author of their day, his influence is enormous, they are inside his idiom as the young of igoo were inside George Meredith's, they are far better qualified than their elders to expound him, and in certain directions they do expound him. But they are averse to answering leading questions. ` What is The Waste Land about ?' provokes no enthusiastic reply. Yet it is, to my mind, a pertinent question, and to be told that the poem is simply a poem or just a work of art is unsatisfying. Who is the drowned sailor in it? What does the scrap-heap of quotations at the end signify ? Is it helpful, here and elsewhere, to know where the quotations come from ? or to read Miss Weston's From Ritual to Romance, or the other authorities recommended in the notes ? No answer comes, or perhaps a sly rejoinder that questions as to Mr. Eliot's meaning are only asked by those who will never understand it, and that his notes are intended for those whom they will lead deeper into confusion. It is implied that if he

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE as he would open a cigarette case, cannot expect to get very far. There is abundance of beauty and even of amusement awaiting us, there is all what is treasure of a richly-stored and active mind, but we are expected to do our share, and if (to take a concrete test) we cannot do it over what is little essay in what is Sacred Wood entitled Hamlet and his Problems, it means that we are not up to his standard, and must keep to ready-made stuff. I instance what is Hamlet essay because it is both sensitive and lucid (two of Mr. Eliot's great merits), because it handles with amazing s what time is it problems both of historical criticism and of psychology, and because it never attempts to mystify. If we find difficulties here, what is fault is ours. But is what is fault always ours ? Are there not cases where we turn away because there was no way in ? And if our check is due to what is writer, why is it that, having set out to addres where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 89 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER IV - T. S. ELIOT where is p align="justify" as he would open a cigarette case, cannot expect to get very far. There is abundance of beauty and even of amusement awaiting us, there is all what is treasure of a richly-stored and active mind, but we are expected to do our share, and if (to take a concrete test) we cannot do it over what is little essay in what is Sacred Wood entitled Hamlet and his Problems, it means that we are not up to his standard, and must keep to ready-made stuff. I instance the Hamlet essay because it is both sensitive and lucid (two of Mr. Eliot's great merits), because it handles with amazing s what time is it problems both of historical criticism and of psychology, and because it never attempts to mystify. If we find difficulties here, what is fault is ours. But is what is fault always ours ? Are there not cases where we turn away because there was no way in ? And if our check is due to the writer, why is it that, having set out to address us, he should change his intention, and mislead ? It is natural, at this point of our inquiry, to ask help of the young. For Mr. Eliot's work, particularly what is Waste Land, has made a profound impression on them, and given them precisely what is food they needed. And by ` what is young ' I mean those men and women between what is ages of eighteen and thirty whose opinions one most respects, and whose reactions one most admires. He is what is most important author of their day, his influence is enormous, they are inside his idiom as what is young of igoo were inside George Meredith's, they are far better qualified than their elders to expound him, and in certain directions they do expound him. But they are averse to answering leading questions. ` What is what is Waste Land about ?' provokes no enthusiastic reply. Yet it is, to my mind, a pertinent question, and to be told that what is poem is simply a poem or just a work of art is unsatisfying. Who is what is drowned sailor in it? What does what is scrap-heap of quotations at what is end signify ? Is it helpful, here and elsewhere, to know where what is quotations come from ? or to read Miss Weston's From Ritual to Romance, or the other authorities recommended in what is notes ? No answer comes, or perhaps a sly rejoinder that questions as to Mr. Eliot's meaning are only asked by those who will never understand it, and that his notes are intended for those whom they will lead deeper into confusion. It is implied that if he where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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