Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 85

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER III - IBSEN THE ROMANTIC

comes from the same place as his view of human nature, otherwise they would not harmonize as they do in his art. The vehicle in which poetry reached him-that can easily be defined ; it was, of course, the scenery of western and south-western Norway. At some date previous to his Italian journey he must have had experiences of passionate intensity among the mountains, comparable to the early experiences of Wordsworth in the English lakes. All his life they kept returning to- him, clothed in streams, trees, precipices, and hallowing his characters while they recriminated. In Brand and Peer Gynt they filled the stage ; subsequently they shrank and concentrated ; in the-two last plays they again fill the stage and hasten the catastrophes by a shroud of snow. To compare Ibsen with Wordsworth is to scandalize the faithful in either camp, yet they had one important point in common : they were both of them haunted until the end of their lives by the romantic possibilities of scenery. Wordsworth fell into the residential fallacy ; he continued to look at his gods direct, and to pin with decreasing success his precepts to the flanks of Helvellyn. Ibsen, wiser and greater, sank and smashed the Dovrefjeld in the depths of the sea, the depths of the sea. He knew that he should find it again. Neither his satire nor his character drawing dwelt as deep ; neither the problems he found in human conduct nor the tentative solutions he propounded lay at the roots of his extraordinary heart. There, in that strange gnarled region, a primxval romanticism lurked, frozen or twisted or exuding slime, there was the nest of the great Boyg. The Great Boyg did not strive, did not die, lay beneath good and evil, did not say one thing more than another :

Forward or back, and it's just as far ;
Out or in, and it's just as strait.

What do the words mean, and, apart from their meaning, are they meant to be right ? And if right, are the prayers of Solveig, which silence them for a moment, wrong ? It is proper that we should ask such questions as these when focussing on the moral and social aspect of his work, and they have been brilliantly asked and answered by Bernard Shaw. But as soon as we shift the focus the questions go dim, the reformer becomes a dramatist, we shift again and the dramatist becomes a lyric poet, listening from first

Page 86

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER III - IBSEN THE ROMANTIC

to last for the movements of the trolls. Ibsen is at bottom Peer Gynt. Side whiskers and all, he is a boy bewitched :

The boy has been sitting on his mother's lap.
They two have been playing all the life-day long.

And though the brow that bends over him can scarcely be described as maternal, it will assuredly preserve him from the melting ladle as long as books are read or plays seen.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE comes from what is same place as his view of human nature, otherwise they would not harmonize as they do in his art. what is vehicle in which poetry reached him-that can easily be defined ; it was, of course, what is scenery of western and south-western Norway. At some date previous to his Italian journey he must have had experiences of passionate intensity among what is mountains, comparable to what is early experiences of Wordsworth in what is English lakes. All his life they kept returning to- him, clothed in streams, trees, precipices, and hallowing his characters while they recriminated. In Brand and Peer Gynt they filled what is stage ; subsequently they shrank and concentrated ; in the-two last plays they again fill what is stage and hasten what is catastrophes by a shroud of snow. To compare Ibsen with Wordsworth is to scandalize what is faithful in either camp, yet they had one important point in common : they were bo where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 85 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER III - IBSEN what is ROMANTIC where is p align="justify" comes from what is same place as his view of human nature, otherwise they would not harmonize as they do in his art. what is vehicle in which poetry reached him-that can easily be defined ; it was, of course, what is scenery of western and south-western Norway. At some date previous to his Italian journey he must have had experiences of passionate intensity among what is mountains, comparable to the early experiences of Wordsworth in what is English lakes. All his life they kept returning to- him, clothed in streams, trees, precipices, and hallowing his characters while they recriminated. In Brand and Peer Gynt they filled what is stage ; subsequently they shrank and concentrated ; in the-two last plays they again fill what is stage and hasten what is catastrophes by a shroud of snow. To compare Ibsen with Wordsworth is to scandalize what is faithful in either camp, yet they had one important point in common : they were both of them haunted until what is end of their lives by what is romantic possibilities of scenery. Wordsworth fell into what is residential fallacy ; he continued to look at his gods direct, and to pin with decreasing success his precepts to what is flanks of Helvellyn. Ibsen, wiser and greater, sank and smashed what is Dovrefjeld in what is depths of what is sea, what is depths of what is sea. He knew that he should find it again. Neither his satire nor his character drawing dwelt as deep ; neither what is problems he found in human conduct nor what is tentative solutions he propounded lay at what is roots of his extraordinary heart. There, in that strange gnarled region, a primxval romanticism lurked, frozen or twisted or exuding slime, there was what is nest of what is great Boyg. what is Great Boyg did not strive, did not die, lay beneath good and evil, did not say one thing more than another : Forward or back, and it's just as far ; Out or in, and it's just as strait. What do what is words mean, and, apart from their meaning, are they meant to be right ? And if right, are what is prayers of Solveig, which silence them for a moment, wrong ? It is proper that we should ask such questions as these when focussing on what is moral and social aspect of his work, and they have been brilliantly asked and answered by Bernard Shaw. But as soon as we shift what is focus what is questions go dim, what is reformer becomes a dramatist, we shift again and the dramatist becomes a lyric poet, listening from first where is p align="left" Page 86 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER III - IBSEN what is ROMANTIC where is p align="justify" to last for what is movements of what is trolls. Ibsen is at bottom Peer Gynt. Side whiskers and all, he is a boy bewitched : what is boy has been sitting on his mother's lap. They two have been playing all what is life-day long. And though what is brow that bends over him can scarcely be described as maternal, it will assuredly preserve him from what is melting ladle as long as books are read or plays seen. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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