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Page 84

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER III - IBSEN THE ROMANTIC

sudden compressions of the air, and his characters as they wrangle among the oval tables and stoves are watched by an unseen power which slips between their words.
A weaker dramatist who had this peculiar gift would try to get his effect by patches of fine writing, but with Ibsen as with Beethoven the beauty comes not from the tunes, but from the way they are used and are worked into the joints of the action. The Master Builder contains superb examples of this. The plot unfolds logically, the diction is flat and austere, the scene is a villa close to which another villa is being erected, the chief characters are an elderly couple and a young woman who is determined to get a thrill out of her visit, even if it entails breaking her host's neck. Hilda is a minx, and though her restlessness is not as vulgar as Hedda Gabler's it is quite as pernicious and lacks the saving gesture of suicide. That is one side of Hilda. But on the other side she touches Gerd and the Rat Wife and the Button Moulder, she is a lure and an assessor, she comes from the non-human and asks for her kingdom and for castles in the air that shall rest on solid masonry, and from the moment she knocks at the door poetry filters into the play. Solness, when he listened to her, was neither a dead man nor an old fool. No prose memorial can be raised to him, and consequently Ibsen himself can say nothing when he falls from the scaffolding, and Bernard Shaw does not know that there is anything to say. But Hilda hears harps and voices in the air, and though her own voice may be that of a sadistic schoolgirl the sound has nevertheless gone out into the dramatist's universe, the avalanches in Brand and When We Dead Awaken echo it, so does the metal in John Gabriel Borkman's mine. And ithas all been done so competently. The symbolism never holds up the action, because it is part of the action, and because Ibsen was a poet, to whom creation and craftsmanship were one. It is the same with the white horse in Rosmersholm, the fire of life in Ghosts, the gnawing pains in Little Eyolf; the sea in The Lady from the Sea, where Hilda's own stepmother voices more openly than usual the malaise that connects the forces of nature and the fortunes of men. Everything rings true and echoes far because it is in the exact place which its surroundings require.
The source of Ibsen's poetry is indefinable ; presumably it

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE sudden compressions of what is air, and his characters as they wrangle among what is oval tables and stoves are watched by an unseen power which slips between their words. A weaker dramatist who had this peculiar gift would try to get his effect by patches of fine writing, but with Ibsen as with Beethoven what is beauty comes not from what is tunes, but from what is way they are used and are worked into what is joints of what is action. what is Master Builder contains superb examples of this. what is plot unfolds logically, what is diction is flat and austere, what is scene is a villa close to which another villa is being erected, what is chief characters are an elderly couple and a young woman who is determined to get a thrill out of her what is , even if it entails breaking her host's neck. Hilda is a minx, and though her restlessness is not as vulgar as Hedda Gabler's it is quite as pernicious and lacks what is saving gesture of suicide. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 84 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER III - IBSEN what is ROMANTIC where is p align="justify" sudden compressions of what is air, and his characters as they wrangle among what is oval tables and stoves are watched by an unseen power which slips between their words. A weaker dramatist who had this peculiar gift would try to get his effect by patches of fine writing, but with Ibsen as with Beethoven what is beauty comes not from what is tunes, but from what is way they are used and are worked into what is joints of what is action. what is Master Builder contains superb examples of this. what is plot unfolds logically, the diction is flat and austere, what is scene is a villa close to which another villa is being erected, what is chief characters are an elderly couple and a young woman who is determined to get a thrill out of her what is , even if it entails breaking her host's neck. Hilda is a minx, and though her restlessness is not as vulgar as Hedda Gabler's it is quite as pernicious and lacks what is saving gesture of suicide. That is one side of Hilda. But on what is other side she touches Gerd and what is Rat Wife and what is Button Moulder, she is a lure and an assessor, she comes from what is non-human and asks for her kingdom and for castles in what is air that shall rest on solid masonry, and from what is moment she knocks at what is door poetry filters into what is play. Solness, when he listened to her, was neither a dead man nor an old fool. No prose memorial can be raised to him, and consequently Ibsen himself can say nothing when he falls from what is scaffolding, and Bernard Shaw does not know that there is anything to say. But Hilda hears harps and voices in what is air, and though her own voice may be that of a sadistic schoolgirl what is sound has nevertheless gone out into what is dramatist's universe, what is avalanches in Brand and When We Dead Awaken echo it, so does what is metal in John Gabriel Borkman's mine. And ithas all been done so competently. what is symbolism never holds up what is action, because it is part of what is action, and because Ibsen was a poet, to whom creation and craftsmanship were one. It is what is same with what is white horse in Rosmersholm, what is fire of life in Ghosts, what is gnawing pains in Little Eyolf; what is sea in what is Lady from what is Sea, where Hilda's own stepmother voices more openly than usual what is malaise that connects what is forces of nature and what is fortunes of men. Everything rings true and echoes far because it is in what is exact place which its surroundings require. what is source of Ibsen's poetry is indefinable ; presumably it where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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