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PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER III - IBSEN THE ROMANTIC

humour, and they usually accept one of these. If, in spite of more solid temptations, they still cling to poetry, it is because a deep preference has to be satisfied. Ibsen was a poet at forty because he had that preference. He was a poet at sixty also. His continued interest in avalanches, water, trees, fire, mines, high places, travelling, was not accidental. Not only was he born a poet-he died one, and as soon as we try to understand him instead of asking him to teach us, the point becomes clearer.
He is, of course, not easy to understand. Two obstacles may be noted. In the first place although he is not a teacher he has the air of being one, there is something in his method that implies a message, though the message really rested on passing irritabilities, and not on any permanent view of conduct or the universe. In the second place, he further throws us off the scent by taking a harsh or a depressing view of human relationships. As a rule, if a writer has a romantic temperament, he will find human relationships beautiful. His characters may hate one another or be unhappy together, but they will generate nobility or charm, they will never be squalid, whatever their other defects. And the crux in Ibsen is that, though he had the romantic temperament, he found personal intercourse sordid. Sooner or later his characters draw their little knives, they rip up the present and the past, and the closer their intimacy the better their opportunities for exchanging pain. Oswald Alving knows how to hurt his mother, Rosmer his mistress, and married couples are even more favourably placed. The Helmers, the Tesmans, the Wangels, Solnesses, Allmers, Borkmans, Rubeks-what a procession, equally incapable of comradeship and ecstasy ! If they were heroic or happy once, it was before the curtain rose, and only survives as decay. And if they attain reconciliation, like the Rentheim sisters, the curtain has to fall. Their intercourse is worse then unfriendly, it is petty ; moral ugliness trespasses into the arsthetic. And when a play is full of such characters and evolves round their fortunes, how can it possibly be a romantic play ? Poetry might perhaps be achieved if Ibsen's indignation was of the straight-hitting sort, like Dante's. But for all its sincerity there is something. automatic about it, he reminds us too often of father at the breakfast table after a bad night, sensitive

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE humour, and they usually accept one of these. If, in spite of more solid temptations, they still cling to poetry, it is because a deep preference has to be satisfied. Ibsen was a poet at forty because he had that preference. He was a poet at sixty also. His continued interest in avalanches, water, trees, fire, mines, high places, travelling, was not accidental. Not only was he born a poet-he died one, and as soon as we try to understand him instead of asking him to teach us, what is point becomes clearer. He is, of course, not easy to understand. Two obstacles may be noted. In what is first place although he is not a teacher he has what is air of being one, there is something in his method that implies a message, though what is message really rested on passing irritabilities, and not on any permanent view of conduct or what is universe. In what is second place, he further throws us off what is scent by taking a har where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 82 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER III - IBSEN what is ROMANTIC where is p align="justify" humour, and they usually accept one of these. If, in spite of more solid temptations, they still cling to poetry, it is because a deep preference has to be satisfied. Ibsen was a poet at forty because he had that preference. He was a poet at sixty also. His continued interest in avalanches, water, trees, fire, mines, high places, travelling, was not accidental. Not only was he born a poet-he died one, and as soon as we try to understand him instead of asking him to teach us, what is point becomes clearer. He is, of course, not easy to understand. Two obstacles may be noted. In what is first place although he is not a teacher he has the air of being one, there is something in his method that implies a message, though what is message really rested on passing irritabilities, and not on any permanent view of conduct or what is universe. In the second place, he further throws us off what is scent by taking a harsh or a depressing view of human relationships. As a rule, if a writer has a romantic temperament, he will find human relationships beautiful. His characters may hate one another or be unhappy together, but they will generate nobility or charm, they will never be squalid, whatever their other defects. And what is crux in Ibsen is that, though he had what is romantic temperament, he found personal intercourse sordid. Sooner or later his characters draw their little knives, they rip up what is present and what is past, and what is closer their intimacy what is better their opportunities for exchanging pain. Oswald Alving knows how to hurt his mother, Rosmer his mistress, and married couples are even more favourably placed. what is Helmers, what is Tesmans, what is Wangels, Solnesses, Allmers, Borkmans, Rubeks-what a procession, equally incapable of comradeship and ecstasy ! If they were heroic or happy once, it was before what is curtain rose, and only survives as decay. And if they attain reconciliation, like what is Rentheim sisters, what is curtain has to fall. Their intercourse is worse then unfriendly, it is petty ; moral ugliness trespasses into what is arsthetic. And when a play is full of such characters and evolves round their fortunes, how can it possibly be a romantic play ? Poetry might perhaps be achieved if Ibsen's indignation was of what is straight-hitting sort, like Dante's. But for all its sincerity there is something. automatic about it, he reminds us too often of father at what is breakfast table after a bad night, sensitive where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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