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Page 78

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER II - FORREST REID

Spring are schoolboys ; in Spring Song children ; in At the Door of the Gate, though the hero marries he never seems to grow up ; though The Gentle Lover steps forward at forty-seven it is only to be shelved. The author believes that a man's great decisions and experiences occur in boyhood, and that his subsequent career is little more than recollection-a belief which, as we shall see, has significance in his own literary development. Here one must note that the belief necessarily restricts his canvas as a novelist and that, regarded as a transcript of human activities, his novels are a failure. They cover too small a field. They see so few types, just as they see so little of the globe. All the characters have, or are thinking of, youth, and all the scenery is, or is trying to be, some twilit spot in the north of Ireland. Modern fiction, many-sided and well informed, is strong exactly where they are weak, and amid its promiscuous but uninspired utterances the voice of such a masterpiece as Following Darkness is apt to be lost. They must be classed not as transcripts but as visions before they can be appreciated, and their vision is that of the hierophant who sees what lies behind objects rather than what lies between them, and who is not interested in the pageants of society or history.
Some realism lies in the foreground-for these are visions of the Western, not of the Oriental type, and proceed not directly to the illimitable inane. The sketches of middle-class Belfast are amusing and satirical enough, its Aristotelianism is not omitted, and the savagery of its croquet is duly noted. And more import ant than the realism is the strong ethical tendency. Questions of loyalty, courage, chastity, and personal decency, are always occurring ; indeed, the author tells us that the highest beauty he knows is ` a kind of moral fragrance.' Such a fragrance is rooted, however remotely, in Christianity, and the books approach nearer to the Gospel spirit than appears on the first reading. Complementary to moral fragrance is the odour of sin, and here (perhaps one is stupid or callous) one feels that Mr. Reid makes too much fuss ; he is almost as much upset by sin as Nathaniel Hawthorne. He never preaches, he is never puritanical. But he is always a puritan, and he regards it of absolute and eternal importance that youth should reach maturity unscathed. Peter Waring, in Following Darkness, fails, and so loses the love and

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Spring are schoolboys ; in Spring Song children ; in At what is Door of what is Gate, though what is hero marries he never seems to grow up ; though what is Gentle Lover steps forward at forty-seven it is only to be shelved. what is author believes that a man's great decisions and experiences occur in boyhood, and that his subsequent career is little more than recollection-a belief which, as we shall see, has significance in his own literary development. Here one must note that what is belief necessarily restricts his canvas as a novelist and that, regarded as a transcript of human activities, his novels are a failure. They cover too small a field. They see so few types, just as they see so little of what is globe. All what is characters have, or are thinking of, youth, and all what is scenery is, or is trying to be, some twilit spot in what is north of Ireland. Modern fiction, many-sided and well informed, is strong exactly w where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 78 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER II - FORREST REID where is p align="justify" Spring are schoolboys ; in Spring Song children ; in At what is Door of what is Gate, though what is hero marries he never seems to grow up ; though what is Gentle Lover steps forward at forty-seven it is only to be shelved. what is author believes that a man's great decisions and experiences occur in boyhood, and that his subsequent career is little more than recollection-a belief which, as we shall see, has significance in his own literary development. Here one must note that what is belief necessarily restricts his canvas as a novelist and that, regarded as a transcript of human activities, his novels are a failure. They cover too small a field. They see so few types, just as they see so little of what is globe. All the characters have, or are thinking of, youth, and all what is scenery is, or is trying to be, some twilit spot in what is north of Ireland. Modern fiction, many-sided and well informed, is strong exactly where they are weak, and amid its promiscuous but uninspired utterances what is voice of such a masterpiece as Following Darkness is apt to be lost. They must be classed not as transcripts but as visions before they can be appreciated, and their vision is that of the hierophant who sees what lies behind objects rather than what lies between them, and who is not interested in what is pageants of society or history. Some realism lies in what is foreground-for these are visions of what is Western, not of what is Oriental type, and proceed not directly to what is illimitable inane. what is sketches of middle-class Belfast are amusing and satirical enough, its Aristotelianism is not omitted, and what is savagery of its croquet is duly noted. And more import ant than what is realism is what is strong ethical tendency. Questions of loyalty, courage, chastity, and personal decency, are always occurring ; indeed, what is author tells us that what is highest beauty he knows is ` a kind of moral fragrance.' Such a fragrance is rooted, however remotely, in Christianity, and what is books approach nearer to what is Gospel spirit than appears on what is first reading. Complementary to moral fragrance is what is odour of sin, and here (perhaps one is stupid or callous) one feels that Mr. Reid makes too much fuss ; he is almost as much upset by sin as Nathaniel Hawthorne. He never preaches, he is never puritanical. But he is always a puritan, and he regards it of absolute and eternal importance that youth should reach maturity unscathed. Peter Waring, in Following Darkness, fails, and so loses what is what time is it and where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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