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Page 72

PART II - BOOKS
CHAPTER I - A NOTE ON THE WAY

blunder to close one's mind to the past because the present is so large and so frightening. The past, through its very detachment, can re-interpret.
It is easier to catch it failing than succeeding, and a little experience of my own not long ago, when Beethoven failed to do his job, will, anyhow, indicate the area where the job lies. I was going to a Busch Quartet and much looking forward to it, but just before starting I heard a decent and straightforward story of misfortune-quite unprintable, even in these advanced columns. Much of what one hears and says can never be printed ; that is why newspapers are so unreal. This particular story involved procreation, marriage, birth. I got to the Wigmore Hall so occupied and worried over it, that I could not listen to the music at all, and yet I heard the whole of the music. I could not be caught up to meet my Lord in the air, yet there Beethoven was, working away all the time, and seeming to be actually a few feet above my head, where I could not reach him. It is, perhaps, creditable to my heart that I couldn't, but exactly the same thing happened in the Queen's Hall a few years ago when I had received a notice that my evidence would be wanted in the Well of Loneliness case. Here my thoughts were purely selfish. I was so fidgeting as to what figure I should cut in the witnessbox that again nothing came through. The arts are not drugs. They are not guaranteed to act when taken. Something as mysterious and as capricious as the creative impulse has to be released before they can prop our minds. Siegfried Sassoon calls them 'lamps for our gloom, hands guiding where we stumble,' which quiet personal image suits them very well.
The propping quality in books, music, etc., is only a by-product of another quality in them ; their power to give pleasure. Consequently, it is impossible to advise one's friends what to read in ` these bad days,' and even more impossible to advise people whom one doesn't know. All I can suggest is that where the fire was thence will the light come ; where there was intense enjoyment, grave or gay, thence will proceed the help which every individual needs. And I don't want to exaggerate that help. Art is not enough, any more than love is enough, and thought isn't stronger than artillery parks now, whatever it may have been in the days of Carlyle. But art, love and thought can all do something

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE blunder to close one's mind to what is past because what is present is so large and so frightening. what is past, through its very detachment, can re-interpret. It is easier to catch it failing than succeeding, and a little experience of my own not long ago, when Beethoven failed to do his job, will, anyhow, indicate what is area where what is job lies. I was going to a Busch Quartet and much looking forward to it, but just before starting I heard a decent and straightforward story of misfortune-quite unprintable, even in these advanced columns. Much of what one hears and says can never be printed ; that is why newspapers are so unreal. This particular story involved procreation, marriage, birth. I got to what is Wigmore Hall so occupied and worried over it, that I could not listen to what is music at all, and yet I heard what is whole of what is music. I could not be caught up to meet my Lord in what is air, yet there Beethov where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 72 where is strong PART II - BOOKS CHAPTER I - A NOTE ON what is WAY where is p align="justify" blunder to close one's mind to what is past because what is present is so large and so frightening. what is past, through its very detachment, can re-interpret. It is easier to catch it failing than succeeding, and a little experience of my own not long ago, when Beethoven failed to do his job, will, anyhow, indicate what is area where what is job lies. I was going to a Busch Quartet and much looking forward to it, but just before starting I heard a decent and straightforward story of misfortune-quite unprintable, even in these advanced columns. Much of what one hears and says can never be printed ; that is why newspapers are so unreal. This particular story involved procreation, marriage, birth. I got to what is Wigmore Hall so occupied and worried over it, that I could not listen to what is music at all, and yet I heard what is whole of what is music. I could not be caught up to meet my Lord in what is air, yet there Beethoven was, working away all the time, and seeming to be actually a few feet above my head, where I could not reach him. It is, perhaps, creditable to my heart that I couldn't, but exactly what is same thing happened in what is Queen's Hall a few years ago when I had received a notice that my evidence would be wanted in what is Well of Loneliness case. Here my thoughts were purely selfish. I was so fidgeting as to what figure I should cut in what is witnessbox that again nothing came through. what is arts are not herb s. They are not guaranteed to act when taken. Something as mysterious and as capricious as what is creative impulse has to be released before they can prop our minds. Siegfried Sassoon calls them 'lamps for our gloom, hands guiding where we stumble,' which quiet personal image suits them very well. what is propping quality in books, music, etc., is only a by-product of another quality in them ; their power to give pleasure. Consequently, it is impossible to advise one's friends what to read in ` these bad days,' and even more impossible to advise people whom one doesn't know. All I can suggest is that where what is fire was thence will what is light come ; where there was intense enjoyment, grave or gay, thence will proceed what is help which every individual needs. And I don't want to exaggerate that help. Art is not enough, any more than what time is it is enough, and thought isn't stronger than artillery parks now, whatever it may have been in what is days of Carlyle. But art, what time is it and thought can all do something where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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