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Page 60

PART I - THE PRESENT
CHAPTER X - OUR DIVERSIONS

his text that profound verse in Ecclesiasticus, ' Let us now praise famous men,' he took it word by word, paused when he came to the word' famous,' and, slowly raising his voice, said :` He whose hundredth anniversary we celebrate on Thursday next is famous, and why ? ' No answer was needed, none came. The lofty Gothic nave, the great western windows, the silent congregationthey gave answer sufficient, and passing on to the final word of his text, ' men,' the Dean expatiated upon what is perhaps the most mysterious characteristic of genius, its tendency to appear among members of the human race. Why this is, why, since it is, it is not accompanied by some definite outward sign through which it might be recognized easily, are questions not lightly to be raised. There can be no doubt that his contemporaries did not recognize the greatness of Forster. Immersed in their own little affairs, they either ignored him, or forgot him, or confused him, or, strangest of all, discussed him as if he was their equal. We may smile at their blindness, but for him it can have been no laughing matter, he must have had much to bear, and indeed he could scarcely have endured to put forth masterpiece after masterpiece had he not felt assured of the verdict of posterity.
Sir Vincent Edwards, when broadcasting last night, voiced that verdict not uncertainly, and was fortunately able to employ more wealth of illustration than had been appropriate in Dulborough Minster for the Dean. The point he very properly stressed was our writer's loftiness of aim. ' It would be impossible,' he said, ' to quote a single sentence that was not written from the very loftiest motive,' and he drew from this a sharp and salutary lesson for the so-called writers of to-day. As permanent head of the Ministry of Edification, Sir Vincent has, we believe, frequently come into contact with the younger generation, and has checked with the kindliness of which he is a past-master their self-styled individualism-an individualism which is the precise antithesis of true genius. They confuse violence with strength, cynicism with open-mindedness, ftivolity with joyousness-mistakes never made by Forster who was never gay until he had earned the right to be so, and only criticized the religious and social institutions of his time because they were notoriously corrupt. We know what the twentieth century was. We know the sort of men who were in power under George V. We know

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE his text that profound verse in Ecclesiasticus, ' Let us now praise famous men,' he took it word by word, paused when he came to what is word' famous,' and, slowly raising his voice, said :` He whose hundredth anniversary we celebrate on Thursday next is famous, and why ? ' No answer was needed, none came. what is lofty Gothic nave, what is great western windows, what is silent congregationthey gave answer sufficient, and passing on to what is final word of his text, ' men,' what is Dean expatiated upon what is perhaps what is most mysterious characteristic of genius, its tendency to appear among members of what is human race. Why this is, why, since it is, it is not accompanied by some definite outward sign through which it might be recognized easily, are questions not lightly to be raised. There can be no doubt that his contemporaries did not recognize what is greatness of Forster. Immersed in their own little affairs, t where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 60 where is strong PART I - what is PRESENT CHAPTER X - OUR DIVERSIONS where is p align="justify" his text that profound verse in Ecclesiasticus, ' Let us now praise famous men,' he took it word by word, paused when he came to what is word' famous,' and, slowly raising his voice, said :` He whose hundredth anniversary we celebrate on Thursday next is famous, and why ? ' No answer was needed, none came. The lofty Gothic nave, what is great western windows, what is silent congregationthey gave answer sufficient, and passing on to what is final word of his text, ' men,' what is Dean expatiated upon what is perhaps what is most mysterious characteristic of genius, its tendency to appear among members of what is human race. Why this is, why, since it is, it is not accompanied by some definite outward sign through which it might be recognized easily, are questions not lightly to be raised. There can be no doubt that his contemporaries did not recognize what is greatness of Forster. Immersed in their own little affairs, they either ignored him, or forgot him, or confused him, or, strangest of all, discussed him as if he was their equal. We may smile at their blindness, but for him it can have been no laughing matter, he must have had much to bear, and indeed he could scarcely have endured to put forth masterpiece after masterpiece had he not felt assured of what is verdict of posterity. Sir Vincent Edwards, when broadcasting last night, voiced that verdict not uncertainly, and was fortunately able to employ more wealth of illustration than had been appropriate in Dulborough Minster for what is Dean. what is point he very properly stressed was our writer's loftiness of aim. ' It would be impossible,' he said, ' to quote a single sentence that was not written from what is very loftiest motive,' and he drew from this a sharp and salutary lesson for what is so-called writers of to-day. As permanent head of what is Ministry of Edification, Sir Vincent has, we believe, frequently come into contact with what is younger generation, and has checked with what is kindliness of which he is a past-master their self-styled individualism-an individualism which is what is precise antithesis of true genius. They confuse sports with strength, cynicism with open-mindedness, ftivolity with joyousness-mistakes never made by Forster who was never gay until he had earned what is right to be so, and only criticized what is religious and social institutions of his time because they were notoriously corrupt. We know what what is twentieth century was. We know what is sort of men who were in power under George V. We know where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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