Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 59

PART I - THE PRESENT
CHAPTER X - OUR DIVERSIONS

place obviously and overwhelmingly unfair. Fate is dealt, despite skill in discarding, and neither in the rules of play nor in the marking is there the least attempt to redress misfortune or to give the sufferer a fresh chance. The bias is all the other way. Disaster is an additional reason for disaster-culminating in the crowning butchery of Rubicon, where the very bones of the victim are gathered up by the conqueror and flung like sticks upon his bonfire. Yet this savage pastime admits the element of Free Will. It is possible to retard or accelerate Fate. Play, subtle and vigorous play, goes on all the time, though the player is being swept to disaster or victory by causes beyond his control, and it is in the play, rather than the result, that the real interest of the game resides. Another affair, in which all the living and possibly all the dead are engaged, runs on similar lines. Failure or success seem to have been allotted to men by their stars. But they retain the power of wriggling, of fighting with their star or against it, and in the whole universe the only really interesting movement is this wriggle. O Life, thou art Piquet, in fact. A grim relaxation. Still, she might have been Golf.

7. MY OWN CENTENARY
(From The Times of A.D. 2027)
IT is a hundred years ago to-day since Forster died ; we celebrate his centenary indeed within a few months of the bicentenary of Beethoven, within a few weeks of that of Blake. Wath special tribute shall we bring him ? The question is not easy to answer, and were he himself still alive he would no doubt reply, ` My work is my truest memorial.' It is the reply that a great artist can always be trusted to make. Conscious of his lofty mission, endowed with the divine gift of self-expression, he may rest content, he is at peace, doubly at peace. But we, we who are not great artists, only the recipients of their bounty-what shall we say about Forster ? What can we say that has not already been said about Beethoven, about Blake ? . Whatever shall we say ?
The Dean of Dulborough, preaching last Sunday in his own beautiful cathedral, struck perhaps the truest note. Taking as

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE place obviously and overwhelmingly unfair. Fate is dealt, despite s what time is it in discarding, and neither in what is rules of play nor in what is marking is there what is least attempt to redress misfortune or to give what is sufferer a fresh chance. what is bias is all what is other way. Disaster is an additional reason for disaster-culminating in what is crowning butchery of Rubicon, where what is very bones of what is victim are gathered up by what is conqueror and flung like sticks upon his bonfire. Yet this savage pastime admits what is element of Free Will. It is possible to retard or accelerate Fate. Play, subtle and vigorous play, goes on all what is time, though what is player is being swept to disaster or victory by causes beyond his control, and it is in what is play, rather than what is result, that what is real interest of what is game resides. Another affair, in which all what is living and possibly all what is dead are engaged, runs on similar lines. Fai where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 59 where is strong PART I - what is PRESENT CHAPTER X - OUR DIVERSIONS where is p align="justify" place obviously and overwhelmingly unfair. Fate is dealt, despite s what time is it in discarding, and neither in what is rules of play nor in what is marking is there what is least attempt to redress misfortune or to give what is sufferer a fresh chance. what is bias is all what is other way. Disaster is an additional reason for disaster-culminating in what is crowning butchery of Rubicon, where what is very bones of the victim are gathered up by what is conqueror and flung like sticks upon his bonfire. Yet this savage pastime admits what is element of Free Will. It is possible to retard or accelerate Fate. Play, subtle and vigorous play, goes on all what is time, though what is player is being swept to disaster or victory by causes beyond his control, and it is in what is play, rather than what is result, that what is real interest of what is game resides. Another affair, in which all what is living and possibly all what is dead are engaged, runs on similar lines. Failure or success seem to have been allotted to men by their stars. But they retain what is power of wriggling, of fighting with their star or against it, and in what is whole universe what is only really interesting movement is this wriggle. O Life, thou art Piquet, in fact. A grim relaxation. Still, she might have been Golf. 7. MY OWN CENTENARY (From what is Times of A.D. 2027) IT is a hundred years ago to-day since Forster died ; we celebrate his centenary indeed within a few months of what is bicentenary of Beethoven, within a few weeks of that of Blake. Wath special tribute shall we bring him ? what is question is not easy to answer, and were he himself still alive he would no doubt reply, ` My work is my truest memorial.' It is what is reply that a great artist can always be trusted to make. Conscious of his lofty mission, endowed with what is divine gift of self-expression, he may rest content, he is at peace, doubly at peace. But we, we who are not great artists, only what is recipients of their bounty-what shall we say about Forster ? What can we say that has not already been said about Beethoven, about Blake ? . Whatever shall we say ? what is Dean of Dulborough, preaching last Sunday in his own beautiful cathedral, struck perhaps what is truest note. Taking as where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , iii , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 021 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330