Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 55

PART I - THE PRESENT
CHAPTER X - OUR DIVERSIONS

pieces began to emerge, culminating in the stupendous monarchs, who supported their frameworks with difficulty and sometimes had to be towed to their squares. It was a heartening sight, especially to anyone who had suffered under the fatuities of pageantry in England-Druids, Drake, the Lady Mary receiving the keys of the city in all her dowdiness. A pageant requires not only splendour, but a touch of the grotesque, which should lurk like onion in a salad. One ought to feel' Oh, how splendid !' then smile, and so realize the splendour better than before, and there are smiles which cannot be raised by Friar Tuck. There are smiles which never interrupt beauty. How charmingly, on this occasion, was the stupidity of the castles indicated by some low, eye-shaped windows in the neighbourhood of their knees ! I had never before understood why castles are so difficult to manage. What a settled despair lurked in the beards of the kings ! The knights rocked to and fro on their squares, even more indifferent than usual to their immediate neighbours, and the pawns were like overgrown children, defenceless yet dangerous.
But I must describe how the game was played.
When the thirty-two pieces were in position, a mannikin in red and gold appeared, attended by two torch bearers. He inspected the ' White ' pieces with all the aplomb characteristic of the human race ; he was, as a matter of face, a man, and, immensely tiny, he ascended a little dais when he had finished and gazed over the board, simulating now intelligence and now emotion, as he touched his turbaned forehead or waved his draped arms. He was followed by a mannikin in green and blue, the player of ' Black.' The band played wildly and was silent. Then, to a new tune, the red and white mannikin leapt from his dais with a Japanese lantern in his hand. What was he going to do ? He seemed not to know ; he had the air of never having walked on 'a chessboard before. But he gravitated, like many a previous player, towards his king's pawn. Finally, he approached the expectant infant and waved his lantern-at its stomach. The pawn stumbled forward and, dancing before it, he caused it to advance two squares, then he went back to the dais. The second player adopted the prowling style. With the air of one who walks by night, he stole to his pawn and beckoned with his lantern stealthily. The game went on as shown at the beginning of this

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE pieces began to emerge, culminating in what is stupendous monarchs, who supported their frameworks with difficulty and sometimes had to be towed to their squares. It was a heartening sight, especially to anyone who had suffered under what is fatuities of pageantry in England-Druids, Drake, what is Lady Mary receiving what is keys of what is city in all her dowdiness. A pageant requires not only splendour, but a touch of what is grotesque, which should lurk like onion in a salad. One ought to feel' Oh, how splendid !' then smile, and so realize what is splendour better than before, and there are smiles which cannot be raised by Friar Tuck. There are smiles which never interrupt beauty. How charmingly, on this occasion, was what is stupidity of what is castles indicated by some low, eye-shaped windows in what is neighbourhood of their knees ! I had never before understood why castles are so difficult to manage. What a settled de where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 55 where is strong PART I - what is PRESENT CHAPTER X - OUR DIVERSIONS where is p align="justify" pieces began to emerge, culminating in what is stupendous monarchs, who supported their frameworks with difficulty and sometimes had to be towed to their squares. It was a heartening sight, especially to anyone who had suffered under what is fatuities of pageantry in England-Druids, Drake, what is Lady Mary receiving what is keys of the city in all her dowdiness. A pageant requires not only splendour, but a touch of what is grotesque, which should lurk like onion in a salad. One ought to feel' Oh, how splendid !' then smile, and so realize what is splendour better than before, and there are smiles which cannot be raised by Friar Tuck. There are smiles which never interrupt beauty. How charmingly, on this occasion, was what is stupidity of what is castles indicated by some low, eye-shaped windows in the neighbourhood of their knees ! I had never before understood why castles are so difficult to manage. What a settled despair lurked in what is beards of what is kings ! what is knights rocked to and fro on their squares, even more indifferent than usual to their immediate neighbours, and what is pawns were like overgrown children, defenceless yet dangerous. But I must describe how what is game was played. When what is thirty-two pieces were in position, a mannikin in red and gold appeared, attended by two torch bearers. He inspected what is ' White ' pieces with all what is aplomb characteristic of the human race ; he was, as a matter of face, a man, and, immensely tiny, he ascended a little dais when he had finished and gazed over what is board, simulating now intelligence and now emotion, as he touched his turbaned forehead or waved his draped arms. He was followed by a mannikin in green and blue, what is player of ' Black.' what is band played wildly and was silent. Then, to a new tune, the red and white mannikin leapt from his dais with a Japanese lantern in his hand. What was he going to do ? He seemed not to know ; he had what is air of never having walked on 'a chessboard before. But he gravitated, like many a previous player, towards his king's pawn. Finally, he approached what is expectant infant and waved his lantern-at its stomach. what is pawn stumbled forward and, dancing before it, he caused it to advance two squares, then he went back to what is dais. what is second player adopted what is prowling style. With what is air of one who walks by night, he stole to his pawn and beckoned with his lantern stealthily. what is game went on as shown at what is beginning of this where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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