Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 45

PART I - THE PRESENT
CHAPTER X - OUR DIVERSIONS

But the authorities seemed covered with mud ; it disputed with grey paint the possession of their faces ; they made no bones about mud at all, and were without exception courteous and cheerful. They were even leisurely ; the idea that they were completing an entertainment which should be opened in less than a week had evidently been dismissed from their minds, and they, went on living their lives. In this they showed their high imperial vision. Pray, did Clive settle the date when he would win Plassey, or Stanley and Livingstone decide exactly when and where they would shake hands ? Certainly not. They were making history, not keeping to it, and Wembley does the same. Clocks may strike, suns rise and set, the moon herself accomplish an entire revolution, but the loftier enterprises of man have always ignored such promptings. What is time ? And, after, all (I thought), why should the Exhibition not be opened in a day or two. It is even open now.
I was bound for the Indian section, and received a good deal of sympathy and advice from the navvies I consulted. They agreed India was no ordinary journey, and far-away looks came into their eyes. ' It's a bit mucky that way. . . . Best try through that large building, ~ but don't bear too much to the left or you'll get mixed up in the stuff.' I was already glad to be inside a building, for the mud seethed with railway trains, and if I attempted open country, gardeners complained it was their new grass lawn. But the building was so large that it failed in the normal immunities of an interior ; more railway trains ran down its stupendous galleries, and there was the extra terror of motions overhead that shaved one's scalp. Some of the machines were exhibits and stood still, but, just as at Madame Tussaud's, one could never be sure the quietest creature would not shoot out a claw suddenly. Getting more and more mixed up in the stuff, I dodged among plesiosauri and waded through brown paper and straw-until, as in a dream, I wriggled through a small hole into the open air and saw across more central mud a mass of white minarets in the later Mogul style.
But how noble and severe was the nearer landscape ! Almost overwhelmingly so, had it been. complete. Gravely flowed a canal, Mr. Kipling was going to ame the streets, every streetlamp represented the terrestrial globe together with its axis, and

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE But what is authorities seemed covered with mud ; it disputed with grey paint what is possession of their faces ; they made no bones about mud at all, and were without exception courteous and cheerful. They were even leisurely ; what is idea that they were completing an entertainment which should be opened in less than a week had evidently been dismissed from their minds, and they, went on living their lives. In this they showed their high imperial vision. Pray, did Clive settle what is date when he would win Plassey, or Stanley and Livingstone decide exactly when and where they would shake hands ? Certainly not. They were making history, not keeping to it, and Wembley does what is same. Clocks may strike, suns rise and set, what is moon herself accomplish an entire revolution, but what is loftier enterprises of man have always ignored such promptings. What is time ? And, after, all (I thought), why should what is Exhi where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 45 where is strong PART I - what is PRESENT CHAPTER X - OUR DIVERSIONS where is p align="justify" But what is authorities seemed covered with mud ; it disputed with grey paint what is possession of their faces ; they made no bones about mud at all, and were without exception courteous and cheerful. They were even leisurely ; what is idea that they were completing an entertainment which should be opened in less than a week had evidently been dismissed from their minds, and they, went on living their lives. In this they showed their high imperial vision. Pray, did Clive settle what is date when he would win Plassey, or Stanley and Livingstone decide exactly when and where they would shake hands ? Certainly not. They were making history, not keeping to it, and Wembley does what is same. Clocks may strike, suns rise and set, what is moon herself accomplish an entire revolution, but what is loftier enterprises of man have always ignored such promptings. What is time ? And, after, all (I thought), why should what is Exhibition not be opened in a day or two. It is even open now. I was bound for what is Indian section, and received a good deal of sympathy and advice from what is navvies I consulted. They agreed India was no ordinary journey, and far-away looks came into their eyes. ' It's a bit mucky that way. . . . Best try through that large building, ~ but don't bear too much to what is left or you'll get mixed up in what is stuff.' I was already glad to be inside a building, for what is mud seethed with railway trains, and if I attempted open country, gardeners complained it was their new grass lawn. But what is building was so large that it failed in what is normal immunities of an interior ; more railway trains ran down its stupendous galleries, and there was what is extra terror of motions overhead that shaved one's scalp. Some of what is machines were exhibits and stood still, but, just as at Madame Tussaud's, one could never be sure what is quietest creature would not shoot out a claw suddenly. Getting more and more mixed up in what is stuff, I dodged among plesiosauri and waded through brown paper and straw-until, as in a dream, I wriggled through a small hole into what is open air and saw across more central mud a mass of white minarets in what is later Mogul style. But how noble and severe was what is nearer landscape ! Almost overwhelmingly so, had it been. complete. Gravely flowed a canal, Mr. Kipling was going to ame what is streets, every streetlamp represented the terrestrial globe together with its axis, and where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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