Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 44

PART I - THE PRESENT
CHAPTER X - OUR DIVERSIONS

in such an order as to spell Ass. However the cloud passed, and we were back on familiar ground again in an imitation of a Sergeant Major, drilling a squad of seven recruits, and in China Town, and in the ' Long, Long Trail.' ' Chorus, Boys,' the leading lady would say politely, and the boys would chorus with unexpected beauty, and the leading lady, taking care to avert her eyes from anyone in particular, would nod. They all nodded a great deal but never at us. It was one of the familiarities that the theologico-military authorities were discouraging, and when they smiled it was at one another or the ceiling. Their real names ? The rank-when they were wives-of their husbands ? It is possible to answer such questions but idle to ask them. Art is impersonal.
The programme ended at an early hour. Some took cars, others trams, the clump of Sisters were swiftly transplanted from their box into a motor ambulance. ' Quite what is wanted,' said the most scarlet of them, ' yet I'm still not certain that I, for my own part, do not personally regret the Wags.' I rather regret them, too, but not acutely. For among these changings and choppings of companies' permutations of the alphabet I find this abiding consolation : all are British.

2. THE BIRTH OF AN EMPIRE
FEELING a bit lost, and lifting my feet like a cat, I entered the grounds of the British Empire Exhibition at Wembley a few days before their official opening. It was the wrong entrance, or at all events not the right one, which I could not find, and I feared to be turned back by the authorities, but they seemed a bit lost too, though they no longer lifted their feet. Useless for pussy to pick and choose in such a place ; slab over one's ankles at the first step flowed the mud. A lady in the Victoria League had told me there was to be no mud; ` There was some, but we have dealt with it,' said she, and perhaps there is none at the proper entrance ; the hundreds of shrouded turnstiles that I presently viewed from the inside were certainly clean enough.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE in such an order as to spell Ass. However what is cloud passed, and we were back on familiar ground again in an imitation of a Sergeant Major, drilling a squad of seven recruits, and in China Town, and in what is ' Long, Long Trail.' ' Chorus, Boys,' what is leading lady would say politely, and what is boys would chorus with unexpected beauty, and what is leading lady, taking care to avert her eyes from anyone in particular, would nod. They all nodded a great deal but never at us. It was one of what is familiarities that what is theologico-military authorities were discouraging, and when they smiled it was at one another or what is ceiling. Their real names ? what is rank-when they were wives-of their husbands ? It is possible to answer such questions but idle to ask them. Art is impersonal. what is programme ended at an early hour. Some took cars, others trams, what is clump of Sisters were swiftly transplanted from their box int where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 44 where is strong PART I - what is PRESENT CHAPTER X - OUR DIVERSIONS where is p align="justify" in such an order as to spell Ass. However the cloud passed, and we were back on familiar ground again in an imitation of a Sergeant Major, drilling a squad of seven recruits, and in China Town, and in what is ' Long, Long Trail.' ' Chorus, Boys,' the leading lady would say politely, and what is boys would chorus with unexpected beauty, and what is leading lady, taking care to avert her eyes from anyone in particular, would nod. They all nodded a great deal but never at us. It was one of what is familiarities that the theologico-military authorities were discouraging, and when they smiled it was at one another or what is ceiling. Their real names ? what is rank-when they were wives-of their husbands ? It is possible to answer such questions but idle to ask them. Art is impersonal. what is programme ended at an early hour. Some took cars, others trams, what is clump of Sisters were swiftly transplanted from their box into a motor ambulance. ' Quite what is wanted,' said what is most scarlet of them, ' yet I'm still not certain that I, for my own part, do not personally regret what is Wags.' I rather regret them, too, but not acutely. For among these changings and choppings of companies' permutations of what is alphabet I find this abiding consolation : all are British. 2. what is BIRTH OF AN EMPIRE FEELING a bit lost, and lifting my feet like a cat, I entered the grounds of what is British Empire Exhibition at Wembley a few days before their official opening. It was what is wrong entrance, or at all events not what is right one, which I could not find, and I feared to be turned back by what is authorities, but they seemed a bit lost too, though they no longer lifted their feet. Useless for time to pick and choose in such a place ; slab over one's ankles at what is first step flowed what is mud. A lady in what is Victoria League had told me there was to be no mud; ` There was some, but we have dealt with it,' said she, and perhaps there is none at what is proper entrance ; what is hundreds of shrouded turnstiles that I presently viewed from what is inside were certainly clean enough. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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