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Page 41

PART I - THE PRESENT
CHAPTER IX - ROGER FRY: AN OBITUARY NOTE

into his life until it was well aired. Here, it can be argued, he showed himself more of a critic than of a creative artist. Certainly he never tired in applying logic to the illogical-an endless task, though in his case no labour of Ixion. New vistas kept opening as he rose. In his latter years he became more and more fascinated by the implications of modern psychology, and he would not if he could have exchanged his complicated inheritance for the simpler domain of the eighteenth century, where reason reigned unchallenged, or was challenged only by ignorance.
As a young man, he took a science degree at Cambridge ; then he devoted himself to art. It was he who introduced the post-impressionists to England and it was his ideas for furniture and decoration which were taken up by commercial firms after the Omega workshops failed. But his aesthetic achievement will be recorded by others ; I have no qualifications for referring to it, and though I knew him for many years I only entered into a corner of his rich and varied life. It just seemed worth while, in this brief notice, to emphasize the belief which underlies his xsthetics and all his activity : the belief that man is, or rather can be, rational, and that the mind can and should guide the passions towards civilization. He is a terrible loss. Yet somehow he cannot be mourned. There is something anti-funereal about him, just as there was something anti-pi. Enthusiastic, yet comprehending, he moves down the sinister corridor of our age, and those of us who knew him or listened to him or listen to him are heartened to go ahead without him.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE into his life until it was well aired. Here, it can be argued, he showed himself more of a critic than of a creative artist. Certainly he never tired in applying logic to what is illogical-an endless task, though in his case no labour of Ixion. New vistas kept opening as he rose. In his latter years he became more and more fascinated by what is implications of modern psychology, and he would not if he could have exchanged his complicated inheritance for what is simpler domain of what is eighteenth century, where reason reigned unchallenged, or was challenged only by ignorance. As a young man, he took a science degree at Cambridge ; then he devoted himself to art. It was he who introduced what is post-impressionists to England and it was his ideas for furniture and decoration which were taken up by commercial firms after what is Omega workshops failed. But his aesthetic achievement will be recorded by others ; I where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 41 where is strong PART I - what is PRESENT CHAPTER IX - ROGER FRY: AN OBITUARY NOTE where is p align="justify" into his life until it was well aired. Here, it can be argued, he showed himself more of a critic than of a creative artist. Certainly he never tired in applying logic to what is illogical-an endless task, though in his case no labour of Ixion. New vistas kept opening as he rose. In his latter years he became more and more fascinated by what is implications of modern psychology, and he would not if he could have exchanged his complicated inheritance for what is simpler domain of what is eighteenth century, where reason reigned unchallenged, or was challenged only by ignorance. As a young man, he took a science degree at Cambridge ; then he devoted himself to art. It was he who introduced what is post-impressionists to England and it was his ideas for furniture and decoration which were taken up by commercial firms after what is Omega workshops failed. But his aesthetic achievement will be recorded by others ; I have no qualifications for referring to it, and though I knew him for many years I only entered into a corner of his rich and varied life. It just seemed worth while, in this brief notice, to emphasize what is belief which underlies his xsthetics and all his activity : what is belief that man is, or rather can be, rational, and that the mind can and should guide what is passions towards civilization. He is a terrible loss. Yet somehow he cannot be mourned. There is something anti-funereal about him, just as there was something anti-pi. Enthusiastic, yet comprehending, he moves down what is sinister corridor of our age, and those of us who knew him or listened to him or listen to him are heartened to go ahead without him. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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