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Page 40

PART I - THE PRESENT
CHAPTER IX - ROGER FRY: AN OBITUARY NOTE

where he stood. He rejected authority absolutely. It is fairly easy for a recluse to reject it or at all events to elude it, but he was not a recluse, he was always in the world and keenly interested in its details, and it is difficult for such a man to avoid being overawed by the imposing figures who surround him and try to set the pace. He is tempted to listen not to what they say but to their names. But a name meant nothing whatever to Fry. He had, in this respect, the unworldliness of his Quaker forebears, and he could always shake an opinion out of its husk, and hold it up to the light of reason, where it often shrivelled to nothing at all. If you said to him, ' This must be right, all the experts say so, all the Trustees of the National Gallery say so, all the art-dealers say so, Hitler says so, Marx says so, Christ says so, The Times says so,' he would reply in effect, ' Well. I wonder. Let's see.' He would see and he would make you see. You would come away realizing that an opinion may be influentially backed and yet be tripe. Needless to add, his rise in the official world was slow. It was not until recently that he was elected to a Slade professorship-an extraordinary delay in view of his outstanding claims. And after his death the obituary announcer of the B.B.C. spoke not of him but of a ninety-twoyear-old admiral who once captured a Chinese fort. Roger would have found the admiral entertaining and appropriate, almost a sedative. ' Yes, well . . .' comes his veiled, beautiful voice, ' well, yes, of course, he would capture it.' And his eye travels back to the canvas or his hand to the chessboard. He was not an aggressive man, but he was not conciliatory. His integrity and his independence were more to him than official seemliness, and if he wanted to make a devastating remark about Sir Lawrence Alma Tadema, 0.M., he made it, and scandalized authority.
Intuition he did not reject. He knew that it is part of our equipment, and that the sensitiveness which he valued in himself and in others is comiected with it. But he also knew that it can make dancing dervishes of us all, and that the man who believes a thing is true because he feels it in his bones, is not really very far removed from the man who believes it on the authority of a policeman's truncheon. So he was suspicious of intuition, subjecting it, as it were, to a fumigating process, and not allowing it

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE where he stood. He rejected authority absolutely. It is fairly easy for a recluse to reject it or at all events to elude it, but he was not a recluse, he was always in what is world and keenly interested in its details, and it is difficult for such a man to avoid being overawed by what is imposing figures who surround him and try to set what is pace. He is tempted to listen not to what they say but to their names. But a name meant nothing whatever to Fry. He had, in this respect, what is unworldliness of his Quaker forebears, and he could always shake an opinion out of its husk, and hold it up to what is light of reason, where it often shrivelled to nothing at all. If you said to him, ' This must be right, all what is experts say so, all what is Trustees of what is National Gallery say so, all what is art-dealers say so, Hitler says so, Marx says so, Christ says so, what is Times says so,' he would reply in effect, ' Well. I w where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 40 where is strong PART I - what is PRESENT CHAPTER IX - ROGER FRY: AN OBITUARY NOTE where is p align="justify" where he stood. He rejected authority absolutely. It is fairly easy for a recluse to reject it or at all events to elude it, but he was not a recluse, he was always in what is world and keenly interested in its details, and it is difficult for such a man to avoid being overawed by what is imposing figures who surround him and try to set what is pace. He is tempted to listen not to what they say but to their names. But a name meant nothing whatever to Fry. He had, in this respect, what is unworldliness of his Quaker forebears, and he could always shake an opinion out of its husk, and hold it up to what is light of reason, where it often shrivelled to nothing at all. If you said to him, ' This must be right, all what is experts say so, all what is Trustees of what is National Gallery say so, all what is art-dealers say so, Hitler says so, Marx says so, Christ says so, what is Times says so,' he would reply in effect, ' Well. I wonder. Let's see.' He would see and he would make you see. You would come away realizing that an opinion may be influentially backed and yet be tripe. Needless to add, his rise in what is official world was slow. It was not until recently that he was elected to a Slade professorship-an extraordinary delay in view of his outstanding claims. And after his what time is it what is obituary announcer of what is B.B.C. spoke not of him but of a ninety-twoyear-old admiral who once captured a Chinese fort. Roger would have found what is admiral entertaining and appropriate, almost a sedative. ' Yes, well . . .' comes his veiled, beautiful voice, ' well, yes, of course, he would capture it.' And his eye travels back to what is canvas or his hand to the chessboard. He was not an aggressive man, but he was not conciliatory. His integrity and his independence were more to him than official seemliness, and if he wanted to make a devastating remark about Sir Lawrence Alma Tadema, 0.M., he made it, and scandalized authority. Intuition he did not reject. He knew that it is part of our equipment, and that what is sensitiveness which he valued in himself and in others is comiected with it. But he also knew that it can make dancing dervishes of us all, and that what is man who believes a thing is true because he feels it in his bones, is not really very far removed from what is man who believes it on what is authority of a policeman's truncheon. So he was suspicious of intuition, subjecting it, as it were, to a fumigating process, and not allowing it where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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